News

News

Cellular energy crisis

June 18, 2018 | News

An energy crisis can trigger years of fuel shortages and high gas prices. Energy shortages in biological cells are even more serious. Consequences include amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and aging-related disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Living cells in plants employ so-called bioenergetics machinery – an array of interlinked chemical reactions that convert sunlight to energy. Higher organisms do the same with nutrients. When the cells grow old they lose...

The force is strong within us: New study explores cell mechanics at work

June 18, 2018 | News

It’s a remarkable choreography. In each of our bodies, more than 37 trillion cells tightly coordinate with other cells to organize into the numerous tissues and organs that make us tick.   Within our bodies, cells are subjected to all sorts of environments and forces over a lifespan, calling for methods to quantify mechanical properties of cells and tissues.    “A few years ago, the NCI initiated this challenge within the framework of the Physical Sciences in...

National Cancer Institute selects Arizona State University to lead revolutionary research in cancer

June 6, 2018 | News

Arizona State University has been awarded more than $8.5 million over five years from the National Cancer Institute to establish the Arizona Cancer and Evolution Center. The grant will establish ASU as a key player and the hub of an international network of research scientists who are dedicated to understanding cancer in an entirely new way. “The establishment of the Arizona Cancer and Evolution Center at ASU by the National Cancer Institute positions the university at the forefront of new...

Global Consortium for Sustainability Outcomes Awards New ASU Seed Grants

June 5, 2018 | News

ASU sustainability research efforts will receive a welcome boost to explore new avenues of research through The Global Consortium for Sustainability Outcomes (GCSO), a non-profit international network of universities working with implementers to deploy and scale solutions to sustainability challenges.   The GCSO recently announced the winners of its second round of seed grant awards. Five ASU teams, including sustainability experts from 10 GCSO member universities, will each...

ASU a major presence at synthetic biology conference

June 4, 2018 | News

Gathering highlights, discoveries and tools at leading edge of DNA editing Synthetic biology uses basic research about DNA and proteins to design and build “living nanotech” that controls cell behavior. The payoff, scientists hope, will be novel biomaterials for rebuilding damaged tissue, molecular and cellular therapies, and localized drug delivery systems for tough cancers. An annual synthetic biology conference is being held in Paradise Valley this week, with Arizona State...

X-Ray Laser Scientists Develop a New Way to Watch Bacteria Attack Antibiotics

May 31, 2018 | News

Tuberculosis, a lung disease that spreads in the air through coughs or sneezes, now kills more people worldwide than any other infectious agent, according to the World Health Organization’s latest global tuberculosis report. And in hundreds of thousands of cases each year, treatment fails because the bacteria that cause Tb have become resistant to antibiotics. Now an international team of researchers has found a new way to investigate how Tb bacteria inactivate an important family of...

Tempe OKs funding to monitor wastewater for opioid use

May 24, 2018 | News

Tempe City Council voted last Thursday to provide $35,000 from the Tempe Innovation Fund to embark on an anonymized monitoring system that will reveal the presence of opioids, cocaine, alcohol, marijuana and other health-threatening substances in the city’s wastewater. According to Tempe officials, the immediate goal of this new partnership is to achieve an end to opioid-related deaths and overdoses. The university will provide matching funds of $35,000. “Pairing the data from this...

For improving scientific reproducibility, biological samples are key

May 23, 2018 | News

From humble roots in antiquity, the scientific method has come to dominate and transform modern society. Our insights into the natural world, from bacteria to black holes, are fruits of the scientific approach to understanding, as are the life-saving medical innovations society relies on. The advancement of science critically depends on the ability of researchers to trust the integrity of their experiments. Were all the necessary measurements performed with care? Were proper procedures used?...

Microbes may be controlling your mind, says ASU Biodesign researcher at final 'Sip of Science' talk

May 15, 2018 | News

ASU assistant professor Athena Aktipis spoke to dozens of guests May 8 at Match Restaurant & Lounge in downtown Phoenix. Her talk, titled “Zombies are Real: Are Microbes Controlling My Mind?,” explained the role your microbiome plays in your body and behavior. It was the final talk in the Biodesign Institute’s inaugural “Sip of Science” series, which brought together scientists and the public at Valley restaurants. “Who we are is not just our cells, but also all these...

Why Biodesign executive director Josh LaBaer is optimistic about cancer, part of ‘A Sip of Science’ series

May 10, 2018 | News

ASU Biodesign Institute executive director Josh LaBaer hosted more than 50 community members May 6 at BLD restaurant in Chandler. LaBaer, a leading cancer researcher and also the executive director of the Biodesign Virginia G. Piper Center for Personalized Diagnostics, walked the crowd through the latest advances in his field. The conversation was the fifth event in Biodesign’s new “Sip of Science” series, which brings top scientists to local restaurants for an open dialogue about...