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ASU, TGen, NAU, UArizona and ADHS position state to play a role in the planned U.S. Pathogen Genomics Centers of Excellence

May 11, 2022 | News

A massive effort to track the COVID-19 pandemic in Arizona over the past two years resulted in the genomic sequencing of more than 100,000 samples of the COVID-19 virus by a coalition of Arizona universities and health agencies, including Arizona State University, TGen, Northern Arizona University, the University of Arizona and the Arizona Department of Health Services. This joint enterprise provides a proof-of-concept for building a 21st-century infectious-disease surveillance system to...

Designer neurons offer new hope for treatment of Parkinson’s disease

May 11, 2022 | News

Neurodegenerative diseases damage and destroy neurons, ravaging both mental and physical health. Parkinson’s disease, which affects over 10 million people worldwide, is no exception. The most obvious symptoms of Parkinson’s disease arise after the illness damages a specific class of neuron located in the midbrain. The effect is to rob the brain of dopamine—a key neurotransmitter produced by the affected neurons. In new research, Jeffrey Kordower and his colleagues describe a process...

Artificial cell membrane channels composed of DNA can be opened and locked with a key

May 10, 2022 | News

Technique opens new possibilities for smart drug delivery and other applications Just as countries import a vast array of consumer goods across national borders, so living cells are engaged in a lively import-export business. Their ports of entry are sophisticated transport channels embedded in a cell’s protective membrane. Regulating what kinds of cargo can pass through the borderlands formed by the cell’s two-layer membrane is essential for proper functioning and survival. In new...

Wastewater research grad to continue career at Biodesign Institute

May 5, 2022 | News

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable spring 2022 graduates. Being successful and learning how to tackle new ideas in research is often like playing sports, according to graduating Arizona State University student Devin Bowes. Bowes, who played division II women’s lacrosse at West Chester University of Pennsylvania and had the opportunity to compete nationally, uses her athleticism in the lab. “Research is both a test of...

1st-generation ASU grad gains research experience through Biodesign Institute

May 5, 2022 | News

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable spring 2022 graduates. If someone gave Jasmine Nguyen $40 million to solve one problem, she would invest the money to create a scholarship fund that supports learning for generations to come. “I would strive to make sure every student in Arizona gets the opportunity to pursue higher education or education in general by providing funding for supplies and necessities at school,” said Nguyen, a...

Grad who lives her passion for STEM rewarded with Fulbright Fellowship

May 4, 2022 | News

Miriam Goras has always been fascinated by simple, fundamental questions relating to how nature works, and during her first semester as a sophomore at Arizona State University she began a research regime investigating the underpinnings of Alzheimer’s disease. “I decided to pursue a biochemistry and neuroscience double major because they are research-intensive and I wanted to be able to closely connect the material I learned in the classroom with what I was doing in the lab,” explained...

'Painting with light'

April 29, 2022 | News

A new process being developed by Arizona State University researchers enables color printing on a microscale with a simple, inexpensive additive manufacturing process. Chao Wang, an assistant professor of electrical engineering in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at ASU, has invented a solution-based additive manufacturing process to “paint with light” on glass and plastics. Wang’s novel printing method uses light to control the photochemical reduction of metal...

A sharper image for proteins

April 28, 2022 | News

Proteins may be the most important and varied biomolecules within living systems. These strings of amino acids, assuming complex 3-dimensional forms, are essential for the growth and maintenance of tissue, the initiation of thousands of biochemical reactions, and protection the body from pathogens through the immune system. They play a central role in health and disease and are primary targets for pharmaceutical drugs. To fully understand proteins and their myriad functions, researchers have...

Scientists study microorganisms on Earth to gain insight into life on other planets

April 27, 2022 | News

In Oman, on the Persian Gulf, there is a large slab of ancient seafloor — including ultramafic rocks from Earth's upper mantle — called the Samail Ophiolite. These unique rocks not only provide valuable information about the ocean floor and Earth’s upper mantle, they may also hold clues to life on other planets. To find these clues, a team of scientists from Arizona State University, who are members of the Group Exploring Organic Processes in Geochemistry led by Everett Shock of the...

Crossing barriers: How the rabbit virus myxoma leapt into a new species

April 26, 2022 | News

Viruses are among the most protean entities in nature, ceaselessly mutating and acquiring new characteristics. These tiny entities follow a simple and relentless imperative:  infect as many host organisms as possible. Occasionally, a virus’ genomic alterations enable it to leap from one species to another, in a process known as spillover. In new research appearing in the journal mBio, Masmudur Rahman and his Arizona State University colleagues join international researchers to...