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News

Beuses' $10 million gift to build world’s first-of-its-kind X-ray laser lab at ASU

April 18, 2019 | News

Through their generous philanthropic investments, Leo and Annette Beus have already made a lasting ASU impact. They have changed the face of the downtown Phoenix landscape with the addition of the Beus Center for Law and Society, supported Sun Devil Athletics and provided numerous scholarships to increase student access to a college education. Now, with a new $10 million investment, the Beuses want to help shape the future of medicine and improve the lives of others. Their ever-deepening ASU...

MURI award brings ASU to the forefront of emergent computing

April 17, 2019 | News

What do you get when you combine computer science, physics, robotics and nanotechnology? The opportunity to advance the fundamental understanding of how tiny computer particles can work together to do great things — without any human intervention. Arizona State University Professor Andrea Richa is part of a U.S. Department of Defense Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative effort that seeks to make these fundamental research discoveries in the project “Formal Foundations of...

Epigenetic study reveals potential for earlier diagnosis in Parkinson’s disease

April 16, 2019 | News

Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder, largely affects movement and causes irreversible neuronal damage. It may start with a tremor or it may be manifested in a speech problem; however, by the time symptoms are evident, it is too late to halt the course of the disease.  PD originates from the loss of neurons releasing dopamine. Because these neurons control coordination in movement, their loss results in a multitude of movement-related deficiencies. Although there is...

New techniques may detect CTE in brains of living former NFL players

April 10, 2019 | News

When you search online for “CTE and NFL,” you’ll find a list of 54 professional football players who have died, and were diagnosed with the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE – names like Frank Gifford, Ken Stabler, Bubba Smith and Andre Waters. It’s a smart guess that hundreds more are unaccounted for. Next, you’ll see a list of living ex-NFL players including Brett Favre, Bernie Kosar and Jim McMahon, who have been diagnosed with “likely...

Autism symptoms reduced nearly 50% two years after fecal transplant

April 9, 2019 | News

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one in every 59 children in the U.S. is diagnosed with autism, up from one in every 150 in 2000. They report that “about half a million people on the autism spectrum will become adults over the next decade, a swelling tide for which the country is unprepared.”  The apparent rise in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and its stubborn resistance to treatment has spurred a legion of researchers to enter the field...

Cactus garden plants new ideas for understanding cancer

April 2, 2019 | News

“From the very beginning I had this idea that cancer isn’t something I need to fight or have to try to beat. It’s a natural thing, and I have to learn to live with it.” When Kevin Moore joined the cancer garden project team, he was dealing with stomach cancer. A landscape architect with the Moore/Swick partnership, in Tempe, Ariz., Moore is now cancer-free. Moore explained that while working on the project, he learned that “cancer is a natural thing. Part of my body that went...

Controversy surrounding red wolves and Mexican gray wolves clarified in new study

April 2, 2019 | News

Once, they roamed free in great numbers across the deserts, arboreal forests, grasslands and arctic tundra of the continental US. Today, wolf populations have been sadly depleted, the result of human ignorance, cruelty and loss of their vital habitats. The red wolf and Mexican gray wolf are among the most endangered mammals in North America. Both species at one time were extinct in the wild. At last count, an estimated 114 wild Mexican gray wolves remain in the U.S. and only about 40 red...

Priming the ocean’s carbon pump

April 1, 2019 | News

When it comes to climate change and carbon reduction, Susanne Neuer is thinking small — extremely small. The Arizona State University biological oceanographer, both a professor in the School of Life Sciences and associate faculty in the Biodesign Center for Fundamental and Applied Microbiomics, is an expert on marine phytoplankton, microscopic algae found in the sunlit zone of waters all over the globe. As Neuer is quick to point out, phytoplankton may be small — too small...

Rittmann sounds a call to action for a more sustainable phosphorus supply

April 1, 2019 | News

Bruce Rittmann, director of the Biodesign Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology at Arizona State University, is slated to be the keynote speaker at the Phosphorus Forum 2019 in Washington, D.C., on April 5. Rittmann will discuss “Minimizing P loss and Maximizing Value.” The annual conference attracts scientists and NGOs focused on water quality issues, nutrient recovery technology companies, fertilizer manufacturers, food producers, water utilities, farm consultants, government...

Programmable 'Legos' of DNA and protein building blocks create novel 3D cages

March 29, 2019 | News

The central goal of nanotechnology is the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale, especially to build microscopic devices or structures. Three-dimensional cages are one of the most important targets, both for their simplicity and their application as drug carriers for medicine. DNA nanotechnology uses DNA molecules as programmable “Legos” to assemble structures with a control not possible with other molecules. However, the structure of DNA is very simple and lacks the...