Fundamental and Applied Microbiomics

Attaining discipline-building, difference-making, mission-focused outcomes in the study of microbial communities.

CFAM mission

To develop a thorough understanding of the functional and structural basis of complex systems of microbes, and their relevance for human, animal and plant biology, the environment, and man-made systems. To help create and advance the discipline of microbiomics by developing novel techniques and an integrated systems understanding of microbiomes, so as to establish general functional principles that are not only explanatory, but also predictive, and thus applicable and translatable, of the behavior of communities of microorganisms.

Why microbiomics?

The study of communities of microbes (microbiomes) in a variety of environments, including the human body, has deep roots in disciplines like microbial ecology and environmental engineering.  But the generalized realization that microbiomes play crucial roles in human, animal and plant health, and that they drive many aspects of relevance to our natural and built environment, has emerged only during the last decade as one of the grand scientific challenges of our century. 

 

ASU created the Center for Fundamental and Applied Microbiomics to meet these challenges, building on its history of high-quality, high-impact research on microbiomes from several research groups. CFAM provides a consolidated, visible, efficient and interdisciplinary platform that enables us to be advance the field arena, bringing together existing local expertise and new world-class recruits, and endowing them with thecommon resources that will allow them to attain discipline-building, difference-making, mission-focused outcomes.  

The center is a part of the Biodesign Institute, and counts on the initial academic support of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Fulton Schools of Engineering, the College of Nursing and Health Innovation, and the College of Health Solutions.  The center provides unparalleled opportunities for interaction and synergy with other high-impact ASU initiatives like the Center for Evolution and Medicine, the ASU-Mayo Collaboration, and the newly funded Engineering Research Center on Biogeotechnics (CBBG).