News

Memorial Day Holiday

January 1, 1970

The university will be closed for the holiday. More information 

Evaluating Prognostic Accuracy of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Active Surveillance Study

January 1, 1970

Yunro “Roy” Chung, Ph. D., Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Active Surveillance for patients diagnosed with low-grade cancer has become a population management strategy for reducing overtreatment. Novel biomarkers have been sought for decision making during Active Surveillance. The accuracy of the decision tools for such a purpose needs to be quantified. The evaluation can be challenging due to the lack of definite measurement of outcomes on all...

New Insights in Multicolor Panel Design

January 1, 1970

Lisa Bellemare, Technical Applications Specialist, BD Sciences Learn to optimize antibody/fluorochrome combination choices. This seminar will discuss tools that classify antigen expression across multiple immune cell types to help you confidently choose the best antibody candidates for your experiment. See how to significantly reduce complexity, minimize spectral overlap and maximize population resolution when using multiple fluorochromes. Learn about the new Guided Panel Design Tool....

Climate change is conspicuously absent from college textbooks

January 1, 1970

ASU graduate student Rachel Yoho was recently featured on the NexusMedia story "Climate Change Is Conspicuously Absent From College Textbooks." Yoho was concerned about the apparent absence of information about climate change in college textbooks. So, while pursuing her doctorate at ASU, she decided to look into the matter. Yoho and her collaborator, Bruce Rittmann, director of ASU’s Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, examined introductory textbooks in physics,...

Microbes may be controlling your mind, says ASU Biodesign researcher at final 'Sip of Science' talk

January 1, 1970

ASU assistant professor Athena Aktipis spoke to dozens of guests May 8 at Match Restaurant & Lounge in downtown Phoenix. Her talk, titled “Zombies are Real: Are Microbes Controlling My Mind?,” explained the role your microbiome plays in your body and behavior. It was the final talk in the Biodesign Institute’s inaugural “Sip of Science” series, which brought together scientists and the public at Valley restaurants. “Who we are is not just our cells, but also all these...

Why Biodesign executive director Josh LaBaer is optimistic about cancer, part of ‘A Sip of Science’ series

January 1, 1970

ASU Biodesign Institute executive director Josh LaBaer hosted more than 50 community members May 6 at BLD restaurant in Chandler. LaBaer, a leading cancer researcher and also the executive director of the Biodesign Virginia G. Piper Center for Personalized Diagnostics, walked the crowd through the latest advances in his field. The conversation was the fifth event in Biodesign’s new “Sip of Science” series, which brings top scientists to local restaurants for an open dialogue about...

Finding passion in research that makes an impact

January 1, 1970

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2018 commencement.  The opioid epidemic is affecting millions across the country. But for Adam Gushgari, who is graduating with his PhD in civil, environmental and sustainable engineering, that impact hit closer to home. After two close friends died from overdoses, Gushgari was inspired to pursue a course of study that would help stem such tragedies and have a positive impact on the world. Today, he is testing...

Scientists present research at latest meeting of Arizona Wellbeing Commons

January 1, 1970

In an effort to advance the development of cancer diagnostics, therapeutics, treatments and processes, 75 Arizona-based scientists, clinicians and partners gathered April 30 to discuss “Cancer, Immunotherapies and Microbiology.”  A new statewide initiative, the Arizona Wellbeing Commons is bringing scientists, clinicians and partners together in a powerful network of professionals determined to find new answers  to the questions about health issues that impact the...

Behavioral and Social Sciences at the National Institutes of Health

January 1, 1970

William Riley, Ph.D., Director of the National Institutes of Health, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research William Riley will speak at the Tempe campus about the place of behavioral and social sciences at NIH and the impact new sources of data, such as smartphones and wearable sensors are having on research, including the NIH All of Us precision medicine initiative.   Register

Evolving Perspectives on the Genomic Instability and Fitness of Coexisting Tumor Clones

January 1, 1970

Noemi Andor, Ph.D., Instructor of Medicine and Oncology, Stanford University, School of Medicine Scientists and oncologists lack a quantitative model that relates a cancer cell’s genomic instability to its fitness. Each of these two cell properties has its own intricate complexities. Comprehending both fully and concomitantly at clonal resolution has been a challenge. To overcome this challenge, Andor introduces CloneID, a framework that integrates measurements from different technologies,...