News

Single-celled architects inspire new nanotechnology

January 1, 1970

Diatoms are tiny, unicellular creatures, inhabiting oceans, lakes, rivers, and soils. Through their respiration, they produce close to a quarter of the oxygen on earth, nearly as much as the world’s tropical forests. In addition to their ecological success across the planet, they have a number of remarkable properties. Diatoms live in glasslike homes of their own design, visible under magnification in an astonishing and aesthetically beautiful range of forms. Researchers have found...

Useful in a pinch: nanoscale tweezers are triggered by light

January 1, 1970

Using segments of DNA, researchers at ASU have constructed a pair of tweezers, measuring 100,000 times tinier than the width of a human hair. A brief burst of ultraviolet light causes the jaws of the tweezers to switch from their closed to open position in seconds—about 65 times faster than similar devices. The new light-activated tweezers are the latest innovation in the fast-moving world of nanotechnology. Devices of this kind, which can directly interact with and influence biological...

Grant Application Office Hours

January 1, 1970

Rachel Levinson, Executive Director, National Research Initiative, Knowledge Enterprise Development, ASU Every sponsor has a process for developing research priorities and turning those into funding opportunities. What if you had the means to identify those priorities before funding opportunity announcements are published and use that intelligence to enhance your probability of funding success? Come to a discussion of best practices including looking upstream at future opportunities,...

Students explore mysteries of the brain in 2018 Neuroscience Scholars program

January 1, 1970

Students from Arizona State University, University of Arizona and universities across the U.S. are spending eight weeks working side by side with some of the world’s most talented scientists, clinicians and researchers in an environment devoted to neuroscientific biomedical research and clinical care. The Banner-ASU Neuroscience Scholars is a paid, eight-week training program open to top-achieving college undergraduate and graduate science students. Scholars work full time on a research...

Volunteers Needed for Chief Science Officer Leadership Training Institute

January 1, 1970

The Chief Science Officer (CSO) program invites you to serve as mentors/presenters at the Fourth Annual Summer Institute. The Chief Science Officers is a collaborative initiative with the Arizona Commerce Authority and the Arizona Technology Council Foundation. The Institute will take place Monday, July 16 through Thursday, July 19, at Arizona State University. You could lead students in grades 6–12, through the Biodesign Experience, be a SciTech Jedi Mentor, lead a STEM demonstration or...

Continental microbes helped seed ancient seas with nitrogen

January 1, 1970

Like our oceans, today’s continents are brimming with life. Yet billions of years ago, before the advent of plants, continents would have appeared barren. These apparently vacant land forms were believed to play no role in the early biochemical clockwork known as the nitrogen cycle, which most living things depend on for survival. Now, ASU researcher Ferran Garcia-Pichel, along with Christophe Thomazo, from the Laboratoire Biogéosciences in Dijon, France,  and Estelle Couradeau, a...

Self-evaluation Workshop

January 1, 1970

Learn from your Human Resources team how to draft a successful self-evaluation for the annual performance review process. The time is now to brush up on your skills. The review period ends June 30, and self-evaluations will be due to supervisors by July 30. Completing a self-evaluation will provide you with talking points for your annual review with your supervisor and help you set goals for the upcoming year. Learn how to summarize your achievements, review your goals and advance your...

ASU students travel to New York City to compete in Biodesign Challenge Summit

January 1, 1970

Each year, more than 32 million millennials, hipsters and music aficionados attend music festivals in the U.S., camping, clapping and dancing. Just imagine the energy. That’s exactly what a team of students from Stacey Kuznetsov’s Interactive Materials class did when challenged to envision future applications of biotechnology.  This is the second year that an Arizona State University team has participated in the Biodesign Challenge, a competition that attracts creative biology,...

New study suggests viral connection to Alzheimer’s disease

January 1, 1970

Of the major illnesses facing humanity, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remains among the most pitiless and confounding.  Over a century after its discovery, no effective prevention or treatment exists for this progressive deterioration of brain tissue, memory and identity. With more people living to older ages, there is a growing need to clarify Alzheimer’s disease risk factors and disease mechanisms and use this information to find new ways in which to treat and prevent this terrible...

Engineering Cellular Transport Systems to Enhance Lignocellulose Bioconversion

January 1, 1970

Gavin Kurgan, Graduate Research Assistant, Biological Design, Ira A. Fulton Engineering Lignocellulosic biomass represents a renewable domestic feedstock that can support large-scale biochemical production processes for fuels and specialty chemicals. However, cost-effective conversion of lignocellulosic sugars into valuable chemicals by microorganisms still remains a challenge. Genetic and metabolic engineering has allowed researchers to manipulate microorganisms to overcome some of these...