News

Probing life’s simplest organism to understand the complexity of cancer

January 1, 1970

The simplest multicellular animal known to man (Trichoplax adhaerens) has no nervous system, no muscle tissue, and, most importantly, no history of cancer. Typically, cancer is a disease afflicting multicellular organisms that spreads as cells grow and divide. Arizona State University researchers are looking to these small creatures to learn more about how they evade the deadly disease, and the implications this has for other multicellular animals. At the Biodesign Center for...

Hop to it: Researchers evaluate rabbits’ evolved resistance to myxoma virus

January 1, 1970

As most know already, rabbit populations are not easily controlled – they reproduce swiftly, and as a result, they have a severe impact on their environment. This was the case when European settlers introduced the wild European rabbit to Australia in the late 19th century. In an attempt to reduce the population size that had grown to almost a billion rabbits by 1950, Australian scientists released the myxoma virus – a virus known to be deadly to rabbits at the time – to the rabbit...

Varicella Virus Pathogenesis, Latency and Reactivation

January 1, 1970

Ravi Mahalingam, PhD, Research Professor, Department of Neurology, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus Varicella zoster virus (VZV), an exclusively human herpesvirus, causes chickenpox in children establishes latent infection in ganglia and reactivates decades later to produce zoster and associated neurological complications. Clinical, pathological, virological and immunological features of simian varicella virus (SVV) infection in nonhuman primates are similar to VZV infection...

Genomic Insights into Ebola Virus Infection and Spread

January 1, 1970

Jason Thomas Ladner, PhD, Assistant Professor, Northern Arizona University, The Pathogen and Microbiome Institute From 2014-2016, Western Africa experienced the largest Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak ever recorded, with >28,000 reported cases and >17,000 EVD survivors. Liberia was one of the worst-affected countries and to support Liberia’s EVD response, we established in-country advanced genomic capabilities to monitor Ebola virus (EBOV) transmission and evolution. In total, we...

Bio-engineering Myxoma Virus for Oncolytic Virotherapy

January 1, 1970

Lino Torres, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Biodesign Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy This is part of the Biodesign Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy Seminar Series.

Reconstructing the History and Drivers of Viral Epidemics from Genomes of Zika, MERS-CoV, and Ebola Viruses

January 1, 1970

Gytis Dudas, PhD, Consultant, The Scripps Research Institute, Chan Zuckerberg BioHub, Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre RNA viruses have caused a number of notable human outbreaks over the last ten years, like the influenza pandemic of 2009, epidemics of Ebola and Zika viruses in 2014, as well as smaller incidents around the world. Owing to falling costs of sequencing it is now easier than ever to sequence complete viral genomes from such outbreaks, and thanks to a rich variety of...

Is your brain lying to you? What magicians can teach scientists about observation

January 1, 1970

Observation is one of the most powerful tools that scientists use. Scientists meticulously perform experiments, analyze data and interpret the results, then repeat this process hundreds of times. But what if our brains are lying to us? Can scientists trust their observations? Parag Mallick, a computer scientist and researcher at Stanford Medicine and a world-renowned magician, explored these questions during a recent visit to Arizona State University. In “An Evening of Science and...

Plant-derived HIV-1 Virus-like Particles as Potential Vaccine Component

January 1, 1970

This is part of the Biodesign Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy Seminar Series.

Employee Photo Session

January 1, 1970

Stop by the convenient, on-site portrait session. Drop by with your smile on. Your professional photo can be used for your online directory image, lab photo rails, recognition and other needs. This only happens twice a year!

Donor Glycosaminoglycan Chemokine Interactions in Transplant Rejection; Searching for the Sweet Spot

January 1, 1970

Alexandra Lucas, MD, Professor of Practice, Biodesign Virginia G. Piper Center for Personalized Diagnostics Progressive rejection and injury to transplant grafts is a leading cause for late graft loss. Treatment for this ongoing organ damage is limited and the numbers of organs available for transplant or even repeat transplant are small. The donor organ tissue matrix is a new target for treatments designed to reduce inflammation in the donor organ even before transplantation. We are...