stuartl

Stuart Lindsay

University Professor
Biodesign SMB
University Club
University Club

Location: TEMPE

Contact Information
STUART.LINDSAY@asu.edu
(480) 205-6432

Education

  • Ph.D. Physics, University of Manchester, U.K. 1976
  • B.Sc. Physics, University of Manchester, UK. 

Research Interests

Our lab studies single molecule biophysics using scaning probe methods. The idea is to measure and manipulate individual molecules. The premise is that single molecules are simple enough to (eventually) be modeled accurately with computer simulations, yet, in a real environment, complex enough to reflect the variations that are important to their function. Projects include (a) A study of gene transcription using single molecule models of a gene promoter, (b) studies of conduction in single molecules aimed at laying the groundwork for molecular electronics and (c) development of new sngle molecule measurement techniques.

Bio

Stuart Lindsay director of the Center for Single Molecule Biophysics in the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, a University Professor, a Regents Professor, and Nadine and Edward Carson Presidential Chair of Physics and Chemistry. He holds 46 U.S. patents and was co-founder of Molecular Imaging (now part of Agilent Technologies) and more recently, Recognition AnalytiX. He has published more than 200 research papers (h=79) and wrote the standard text in the field "Introduction to Nanoscience," (Oxford University Press). He is a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Institute of Physics. 

Professor Lindsay's research focuses on nano-scale biophysics. He has pioneered aspects of atomic force microscopy, particularly those related to imaging and chemical analysis in water. 

Current research interests include nanoscale chemical mapping, applications of nanoscience for sustainable energy, new techniques for DNA and protein sequencing based on electron tunneling, and nanoscale probes of epigenetic markings and cell biochemistry.