News & Events

Biodesign C will help advance scientific frontiers

October 12, 2016

Arizona State University’s newest research building will be packed with the most advanced construction and technological gear of today. The science that goes on inside will find answers that benefit society every day after. Researchers will tackle the early detection and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, speed up drug discovery and explore new avenues in renewable energy. The third building in ASU’s Biodesign Institute complex, Biodesign C on the Tempe campus, will serve as home...

Tabletop Source of Hard X-rays: Toward a Compact XFEL

October 6, 2016

William Graves, Ph.D., Associate Professor, ASU Physics Department and the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery Advances in accelerator and laser technologies enable optimized production of intense beams of ultrashort X-ray pulses. The X-rays are produced by inverse Compton scattering of a high power laser pulse on a bright electron beam produced by a compact and inexpensive X-band linear accelerator and RF photoinjector. The resulting X-ray beam is orders of magnitude brighter...

Fostering North American partnerships

August 16, 2016

Sethuraman "Panch" Panchanathan (left), senior vice president for ASU's Knowledge Enterprise Development; Joshua LaBaer, an executive with the Biodesign Institute; and Luis Armando Kuroda of Mexico's Salud Digna and Fundación Vizcarra (right) sign a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on Aug. 15. The MOU establishes a commitment to collaborate using ASU's undergraduate and graduate scientific researchers and Salud Digna's preventative health-care services with the goal of bringing greater...

When going small is big news: ASU professor shrinking electron-laser technology

October 14, 2015

Free electron lasers — powerful devices that can peer deep into molecular structure and the ultrafast timescales of chemistry — cost billions to build and are miles long, but an Arizona State University professor is constructing a version that can fit on a tabletop. And it will cost a fraction of the price of its larger peers. This compact free electron laser will be accessible to millions of scientists, instead of hundreds, advancing countless fields of research and potentially...