Teaching

Courses Created

MBB247: Molecular Biology: Fundamentals and Applications (Applied Biosciences: Biotechnology). This course was designed (together with Dr. Hugh Mason) to fill a gap between the first course of the MBB sequence (MBB245/246 or BIO187) and the more advanced courses of this major. The emphasis in this major is on molecular and cellular biology and gene technology and their applications in the growing areas of biotechnology and the molecular biosciences. MBB247 was designed to demonstrate how the accumulating data in molecular biology allow the scientists to apply it toward new and unresolved basic questions as well as toward “real-world” issues in such realms as medicine, agriculture, renewable resources and environmental protection. In designing MBB247 we present molecular biology as an evolving discipline – instead of presenting the students with facts packaged into textbooks, we present a series  of tentative hypotheses and allow the students to follow the experimental path leading to their acceptance. A major emphasis in the course is therefore on how the molecular biologists formulate their questions, the tools they use to try to answer these questions and how conclusions (and new questions) can be drawn from the experimental results. Likewise, the weekly assignments are planned as exercises in scientific deductive thinking. Please refer to the syllabus and samples of representative presentations and homework assignments.

MBB248: Molecular Biology: Fundamentals and Applications Laboratory (Applied Biosciences: Biotechnology Laboratory). This is the companion lab course to MBB247 (co-requisite) and was designed to complement the lectures by providing opportunity for first hand experience with the some of the concepts and techniques introduced in the lectures of MBB247. MBB248 is further aimed at also to introducing the students to the culture of a molecular biology lab: how experiments are conceived and planned, how results are obtained, recorded, interpreted and presented, lab lingo and etiquette, team work, fun, excitement and (occasional) frustration… Following this rationale, the manual we wrote for the course is not the typical student lab cookbook. Instead, the procedures, while clearly stated, leave much of the experimental planning to the students under the guidance and approval of the instructors. In spring 2007, MBB248 was folded into MBB247, which is now a 4-credit lecture/lab course.

 


Courses Taught

BIO181 General Biology I
4 cr
The main introductory course of SoLS with mega enrollment (400-500 students in a section). BIO181 gives introduction to molecular biology, cellular biology, human anatomy and physiology.
Taught: Fall 2010 (with Orchinik), Fall 2011 (with Jindrich)

BIO181 General Biology I for Honors Students
4 cr
The main introductory course for SoLS Honors students. BIO181 gives introduction to molecular biology, cellular biology, human anatomy and physiology.
Taught: Fall 2010 (with Orchinik), Fall 2011 (with Jindrich)

BIO189  Life Sciences Career Paths:     Topic: The Dark Side of the Force
1 cr
Freshmen seminar: overview of modern life sciences, including research trends, extracurricular opportunities, degree programs, and potential careers. My section is described as: “From curare-dipped arrowheads to the Tokyo Subway Sarin attacks and from catapulted corpses of bubonic plague victims to the anthrax letters, humans have been incorporating naturally occurring pathogenic microorganisms and toxic chemicals into their arsenal throughout history. […] Learn about, discuss and maybe get involved in research conducted at ASU to counter the dark side of the force!
Taught: Fall 2010,

CBS530 Introduction to Structural and Molecular Biology
4 cr
A graduate student-level introduction to structure and function of cells, proteins, membranes, and the genome; gene expression and biogenesis of structures; application of computer imaging.
Taught: Fall 2005, Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Fall 2008,

CBS598 Introduction to Structural and Molecular Biology
4 cr
A graduate student-level introduction to structure and function of cells, proteins, membranes, and the genome; gene expression and biogenesis of structures; application of computer imaging.
Taught: Spring 2010,

MBB247 Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biology II (Lecture and Laboratory)
4 cr, was 3 cr through 2006)
Footnote 18 course
 Applies concepts of molecular and cellular biology of bacteria, animals, and plants to real-world problems.
Taught: Spring 2004 (with Joshi and Mason), Spring 2005 (with Mason), Spring 2006 (with Mason), Spring 2007 (with Mason), Spring 2008 (with Mason), Spring 2009 (with Mason) , Spring 2010 (with Mason), Spring 2011 (with Mason).

MBB248 Applied Biosciences: Biotechnology Laboratory
1 cr
Footnote 18 course
Applies concepts of molecular and cellular biology of bacteria, animals, and plants to real-world problems.
Taught: Spring 2005 (with Mason), Spring 2006 (with Mason)

MCB500 Strategies for production of recombinant protein-pharmaceuticals
1-3 cr
A graduate level seminar, where students present their own research as well as recent research literature.
Taught: Fall 2005, Spring 2006, Fall 2006, Spring 2007, Fall 2007, Spring 2008, Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011

MIC591  MIC 591: Milestones in Microbiology
3 cr
A graduate level seminar for review of major milestones in microbiology through student-led (but faculty directed) discussions of seminal papers.
Taught: Fall 2010 (with Clark-Curtiss, Escalante, Garcia-Pichel, Krajmalnik-Brown, Shi),