Ryan Trovitch

Ryan Trovitch

Associate Faculty, Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery
Assistant Professor, School of Molecular Sciences

Bio

Ryan Trovitch is one of Arizona State University’s leading scientists in the areas of green chemistry, catalysis, and the conversion of oxidized carbon sources into value-added fuels and products. Dr. Trovitch’s research is largely focused on the development of homogeneous inorganic and organometallic catalysts that feature Earth-abundant transition metals that include manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum. These catalysts are often supported by a polydentate redox non-innocent ligand that serves to stabilize unusual metal oxidation states and geometries while enabling reactivity that has traditionally been reserved for precious metal catalysts. Manganese compounds prepared by the Trovitch Group have been found to exhibit unprecedented hydrosilylation activities (a reaction of interest to the silicone industry), and have recently been commercialized in collaboration with Sigma-Aldrich Corporation (a subsidiary of Merck KGaA). Researchers in the group have also developed molybdenum catalysts for the selective reduction of carbon dioxide into methanol and cobalt catalysts for the hydroboration of unsaturated organic compounds.

Ryan received a B.S. degree in chemistry from the Honors Program at King’s College (PA) in 2004, and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Cornell University in 2009 under the direction of Prof. Paul J. Chirik. Dr. Trovitch moved to Los Alamos National Laboratory as a postdoctoral research associate in 2008 and was later appointed as a Glenn T. Seaborg Postdoctoral Fellow. While at LANL, he worked with Dr. Kevin D. John, Dr. John C. Gordon, Dr. Alfred P. Sattelberger, and Prof. R. Tom Baker on a range of projects that include iron-mediated nitrogen fixation, the isolation of structurally unique molybdenum compounds, and the spectroscopic investigation of alumina-supported C-H activation catalysts. Dr. Trovitch joined ASU’s Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry (now School of Molecular Sciences) as an assistant professor in 2012.