News & Events

ASU, White House collaborate to investigate mysteries of microorganisms

May 13, 2016

We asked Garcia-Pichel to explain microbiomes, from where they come, the reasons they are important and why it is the right time to studying them more closely. Question: What is a microbe? Answer: A microbiome is the collective ecological community of microbes that reside in an environment, like a human body, a desert or a river. part is really easy. It is a living organism that you cannot see with your naked eye. Q: Where do microbes live? A: They live everywhere. You...

ASU to lead new FDA approved autism treatment study

August 19, 2014

Arizona State University (ASU) will lead a new study examining a novel treatment for gastrointestinal problems in children with autism. This research study has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). About half of children and adults with autism suffer from chronic gastrointestinal problems, which cause pain, discomfort, and irritability. Recent research at Arizona State University (ASU) has suggested that those gastrointestinal (GI) problems may be due in part to...

ASU embarks on $9 million next phase of an effort to assess rapidly an absorbed radiation dose

June 3, 2014

  Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute announced today it is entering a new, $9 million phase of a multi-million, multi-institutional development project to produce a diagnostic test to measure rapidly an individual’s level of absorption of ionizing radiation in the event of an unplanned radiological or nuclear event.  The project is part of a potential $31.2 million in total funds authorized by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA),...

Study strengthens ties between autism symptoms and gut microbes

December 19, 2013

Scientific evidence is mounting that the trillions of microbes that call the human body home can influence our gut-linked health, affecting our risk of obesity, diabetes and colon cancer, for example.  But more recently, researchers are discovering that gut microbes also may affect neurology—possibly impacting a person’s cognition, emotions and mental health. A new study showing that feeding mice a beneficial type of bacteria can ameliorate autism-like symptoms is...

Clues about autism may come from the gut

July 3, 2013

Bacterial flora inhabiting the human gut have become one of the hottest topics in biological research. Implicated in a range of important activities including digestion, fine-tuning body weight, regulating immune response, and producing neurotransmitters that affect brain and behavior, these tiny workers form diverse communities. Hundreds of species inhabit the gut, and although most are beneficial, some can be very dangerous. In new research appearing in the journal PLOS ONE, a team led by...

Complex world of microbes fine-tune body weight

June 5, 2012

Microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract form an intricate, living fabric made up of some 500 to 1000 distinct bacterial species, (in addition to other microbes). Recently, researchers have begun to untangle the subtle role these diverse life forms play in maintaining health and regulating weight. In a new study appearing in the journal Nutrition in Clinical Practice, researcher Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown and her colleagues at the Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology at Arizona...

Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown selected for Phoenix Business Journal’s ‘Forty Under 40’ Honors

May 18, 2012

  The Phoenix Business Journal has named ASU’s Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown to its 2012 “Forty Under 40” list that honors young leaders in the metropolitan area. Krajmalnik-Brown is a scientist who uses new genomic-based tools to uncover the roles of microscopic organisms to clean water, produce energy and positively impact human health.  “My fascination with small life forms and their potential to help solve societal problems drives my research,” says Krajmalnik-Brown, who...

Culprits and cures for obesity may reside in our gut

July 21, 2011

Obesity in the United States is reaching ever more alarming proportions, posing a severe menace to public health and exacerbating a crisis in health care costs both domestically and worldwide. Now, Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown and fellow researchers at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, in collaboration with Dr. John DiBaise and colleagues at the Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, are looking into what may be a leading driver in body weight regulation—the diverse zoo of microorganisms...

Artificial sweetener leaves lingering aftertaste in the environment

June 8, 2011

Recently, the global use of artificial sweeteners in foods has dramatically increased. A new study led by César Torres, and Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown—researchers at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University—examines the trail of sucralose, one of the most popular of such products, after it is digested in the human body. ASU researchers, along with their collaborators, report in a recent issue of the journal Environmental Engineering Science, that sucralose is remarkably resistant...

Scientists mentor future female discoverers

May 27, 2011

To better understand career paths in science, 10 girls who recently placed at the Arizona Science and Engineering Fair spent a rewarding day shadowing women scientists at the Biodesign Institute at ASU. The science fair winners’ day at ASU was part of a collaborative effort with other ASU researchers who are members of the Association for Women in Science Central Arizona Chapter. “Young scientists need meaningful interactions with researchers,” said Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown, Ph.D., of...