Robert Ros

Robert Ros

Faculty Member, Biodesign Center for Single Molecule Biophysics
Professor, Physics Department

Bio

Dr. Robert Ros is Professor in the Physics Department, Assoc. Director of the Center for Biological Physics, and Faculty Member of the Center for Single Molecule Biophysics (SMB) at the Biodesign Institut. After having completed his undergraduate and graduate studies in physics at the University of Freiburg and Heidelberg, Germany, with the Diplom (comparable to master) and a diploma thesis in the field of biosensor technology at the Applied Physical Chemistry Group of Profesor M. Grunze, he joined the Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology at the Paul Scherrer Institute and the group of Professor H.-J. Guntherodt, University of Basel, for his doctorate. In collaboration with the Biochemistry Group of Professor A. Pluckthun at Zurich University, he focused on force spectroscopy experiments on single molecule antibody-antigen complexes and implicating forces with kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. After a postdoc in the lab of Professor H. Siegenthaler, Department of Chemistry, University of Bern and the Paul Scherrer Institut in the field of electrochemical STM, Ros moved to the Physics Department at Bielefeld University, where he started as postdoctoral fellow in the experimental biophysics and applied nanosciences group of Professor D. Anselmetti. In 2001, he was appointed as scientific lecturer (`Wissenschaftlicher Assistent?, C1) and project leader, and received his Habilitation and venia legendi in experimental physics from the Physics Faculty, University of Bielefeld in 2004. After the habilitation he held the position of a university lecturer ('Hochschuldozent', C2) at the Physics Faculty, Bielefeld University, Germany. In 2008, Ros joined Arizona State University, where he holds his current appointment.

Professor Ros is an experimental biophysicist in the field of nanobiophysics with special emphasis on structural biology, physics of molecular recognition, conformational dynamics of single (bio-)molecules, cell adhesion and mechanics using scanning probe methods, force spectroscopy technologies, fluorescence microscopy, and nanophotonics.