News and events

Forrest’s paper garners award for positive impact on the field

May 15, 2019

Maintaining software is costly, and for developers like Facebook and Microsoft, repairing software bugs can be very expensive. Today, most software bugs are repaired by humans – highly trained software engineers. About 10 years ago, a group of researchers, including Stephanie Forrest, director of the Biodesign Center for Biocomputing, Security and Society, looked to biological processes like evolution for ideas about ways to automate de-bugging. The result was a totally new approach for...

MURI award brings ASU to the forefront of emergent computing

April 17, 2019

What do you get when you combine computer science, physics, robotics and nanotechnology? The opportunity to advance the fundamental understanding of how tiny computer particles can work together to do great things — without any human intervention. Arizona State University Professor Andrea Richa is part of a U.S. Department of Defense Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative effort that seeks to make these fundamental research discoveries in the project “Formal Foundations of...

Probing life’s simplest organism to understand the complexity of cancer

February 18, 2019

The simplest multicellular animal known to man (Trichoplax adhaerens) has no nervous system, no muscle tissue, and, most importantly, no history of cancer. Typically, cancer is a disease afflicting multicellular organisms that spreads as cells grow and divide. Arizona State University researchers are looking to these small creatures to learn more about how they evade the deadly disease, and the implications this has for other multicellular animals. At the Biodesign Center for...

Protecting U.S. elections against attack: What’s biology have to do with it?

January 9, 2019

Most of us think of cybersecurity and biology as distinct areas of study. To better understand how we might apply principles of immunology to developing safeguards against cyber attacks, researchers are looking to ways in which the immune system of humans and other mammals naturally combats pathogens. In the first “Dialogues in Complexity” lecture, national experts will present their insights related to this emerging field of study. “Protecting against Bad Actors: From Election...

National Cancer Institute awards Carlo Maley $10.8M grant

November 1, 2018

When Carlo Maley first delved into his studies on the evolution of disease, he was struck with how little the field had been explored. He decided that his skills in evolution and computational biology would be well-suited for the job. “I went to PubMed and looked for all papers that had both cancer and evolution in the title … and I only came up with a handful of hits. It became clear that evolution is fundamental to the basic science of cancer, which explains why people have such a...

Calling all Deadheads: ASU hosts Zombie Apocalypse Medicine Meeting

October 10, 2018

We see it in movies, TV shows and books, but we rarely see it in science – the zombie apocalypse may be nearer than we think, and an ASU-hosted event intends to address that. On Oct. 18-21, ASU will host the Zombie Apocalypse Medicine Meeting, an interdisciplinary gathering blending the arts and sciences to address the provocative, ever-engaging topic of zombies. According to the website, a zombie is defined as “an entity that is fully or partially under control of another entity,” a...

Chokepoints and Censorship: Protecting the Free Flow of Information on the Internet

September 7, 2018

When flying to Beijing, you’ll likely have to take multiple flights and pass through customs to get to your destination. If you’re searching for a Beijing hotel and visit its Chinese website, your request also travels multiple legs through internet networks, entering and exiting the territories of various countries on its way to the Chinese network hosting the website. And like customs and border patrol, there is a potential for governments to place digital filters on information...

Biodesign Institute researcher interviewed on PBS' Arizona Horizon

August 8, 2018

Carlo Maley, a Biodesign Institute researcher and a professor in the School of Life Sciences, was recently interviewed on Arizona PBS' Arizona Horizon. Host Ted Simons talked to Maley about the new Arizona Cancer Evolution Center, which is a new center that aims to attack cancer through groundbreaking, interdisciplinary approaches, including looking at cancer through an evolutionary lens. Arizona State University researchers received an $8.5 million grant from the National Cancer...

National Cancer Institute selects Arizona State University to lead revolutionary research in cancer

June 6, 2018

Arizona State University has been awarded more than $8.5 million over five years from the National Cancer Institute to establish the Arizona Cancer and Evolution Center. The grant will establish ASU as a key player and the hub of an international network of research scientists who are dedicated to understanding cancer in an entirely new way. “The establishment of the Arizona Cancer and Evolution Center at ASU by the National Cancer Institute positions the university at the forefront of new...

Cybersecurity expert speaks out on digital threats and bio-inspired solutions, part of “A Sip of Science” series

March 8, 2018

Our current approach to cybersecurity is not working and it threatens our democracy, economy and critical infrastructure, according to ASU Biodesign professor Stephanie Forrest. Forrest spoke to a group of Phoenix area residents Tuesday night for “A Sip of Science” at The Market by Jennifer’s restaurant. Forrest is director of the Biodesign Center for Biocomputing, Security and Society at Arizona State University and a professor at ASU’s School of Computing, Informatics and Decision...