What is microgravity?

What is microgravity?

October 10, 2014

October 10, 2014

For half a century, humans have reached for the stars to achieve exploration beyond the friendly confines of our tiny blue dot within the solar system. 
 
Astronauts have boldly gone from the Earth to the Moon, flown 135 space shuttle missions, and continuosly orbited onboard the national science lab of the International Space Station.  This near Earth orbital environment, called microgravity, has been a rich source for scientists to conduct experiments to answer fundamental questions. What are the affects of spaceflight on astronaut health? What happens to our bodies in space? How are food, air and water best delivered in orbit? And can these discoveries translate back on Earth to better our lives?
 
Recently, BIodesign Institute researcher Cheryl Nickerson career was highlighted for a Google Science Fair event Hangout on Air, in partnership with Scientific American’s Editor-in-Chief, Mariette DiChristina.
 
The subject: What happens under microgravity?
 
Want to learn even more about cutting-edge microgravity research? Now, Nature Publishing Group and the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University have launched npj Microgravity, a new open access journal.
 
The journal is specifically dedicated to publishing research that enables space exploration and research that is enabled by spaceflight. It will also publish research utilizing ground-based models of spaceflight.
 
“We are in a Renaissance period for spaceflight research that has tremendous potential for breakthrough advances in diverse scientific and technological domains to benefit life on Earth and exploration of space,” said Cheryl A. Nickerson, a professor in ASU's Biodesign Institute, who is the editor-in-chief of the new journal.

 

Written by: Joe Caspermeyer