Sustainable Synthesis of Polyester Fiber and Bottles: Bioinspired Synthesis From Glucose or Plasma Refining of Carbon Dioxide/Methane

Sustainable Synthesis of Polyester Fiber and Bottles: Bioinspired Synthesis From Glucose or Plasma Refining of Carbon Dioxide/Methane

September 5, 2018

Address

727 E. Tyler St.
Tempe, AZ 85281

Location

Biodesign Institute, Auditorium

Date and Time

September 19, 2018, 2:00 pm (Length: 1 hour 0 minutes)

iCal Download

John Frost, PhD, University Distinguished Professor, Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University

The world produces more than 60 billion kilograms of terephthalic acid for polymerization to polyethylene terephthalate, or polyester PET, which is used in the manufacture of plastic bottles, fibers and a myriad of other consumer products. Sustainable synthesis of terephthalic acid entails the bioinspired design of pathways enabling microbes to synthesize chemicals such as muconic acid, isoprene and acrylic acid from glucose. These intermediates are then converted chemically into terephthalic acid. John Frost will present a very different strategy that entails plasma refining of methane and carbon dioxide to from acetylenemonocarboxylic acid.

This is a Biodesign Institute Discovery Series seminar. This event is free, open to the public and seating is on a first-come, first-served basis.