Shelley Haydel teaches a smarter way to battle bacteria

Shelley Haydel teaches a smarter way to battle bacteria

June 14, 2019

  • Bacteria

    In her research, Haydel targets the bacteria responsible for tuberculosis infections. She utilizes genetics and molecular biology to investigate how bacterial cells are able to infect and propagate disease in humans. 


    Download Photo
  • Bacteria

    Biodesign Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy researcher, Dr Shelley Haydel is featured in Ask a Biologist: Career Path and Ask a Biologist, podcast.


    Download Photo

June 13, 2019

 

Arizona State University Biodesign Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy researcher, Shelley Haydel is newly featured in Ask a Biologist.

Shelley Haydel, a Louisiana native, has devoted her wide-ranging career to studying the mechanisms used by bacterial microbes to cause disease. Her early research was carried out within the Louisiana Center for Public Health before she went on to earn a doctorate in Microbiology at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. In addition to acting as a researcher within Biodesign, she is currently an associate professor in ASU’s School of Life Sciences.

In her lab, Haydel targets the bacteria responsible for tuberculosis infections. She utilizes genetics and molecular biology to investigate how bacterial cells are able to infect and propagate disease in humans. Her knowledge is then applied to a clever application using artificial intelligence. She has developed technology that teaches computers how to spot bacterial infections in patient cell samples.

Often, with slow growing bacteria such as tuberculosis, patients may wait months to be properly diagnosed and treated. Because Haydel can program the computer to recognize infections in the early stages, patients can be prescribed the medication they need quicker, improving disease outcomes. Additionally, Haydel’s lab investigates how the earth’s minerals, found within certain clays, are able absorb toxins and fend off bacterial infections.

In the Ask a Biologist podcast, “Mud Science,” Dr. Biology speaks with Haydel about who how she began studying the healing properties of minerals found within the muds of the earth.

Ask a Biologist inspires others to understand Haydel’s science and her approach to battling bacteria with smarter, more efficient methods. This popular internet site is Arizona State’s scientific answer bank that has catered to the passions of the curious minded since 1997. Its mission is to answer any science-based questions that the public-at-large may have within a 72-hour turn-around time. 

The website has been visited by the public over 50 million times and receives over 30 thousand hits per day. The impact of Ask a Biologist reaches far and wide, and is visited by a global audience. Almost half of its daily visitors are seeking answers to science questions from countries outside of the United States.  It is in the top five most visited websites at ASU.

To view the article of Shelley Haydel in Ask a Biologist, follow this link: Smarter Ways to Battle Bacteria and her podcast link: Mud Science.

 

Written by: Christine Lewis