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News

New plant-based vaccine at the forefront of more efficient, affordable HPV prevention

March 11, 2019 | News

The Gardasil vaccine advertisement flashes across the screen – you change the channel. Maybe you are a male and don’t think you are at risk of acquiring cancer from HPV, maybe you aren’t sexually active, or maybe you don’t have the resources to get the vaccine. But research shows that in addition to causing cervical cancer in women, certain strains have been linked to head and neck cancers in men. The Gardasil-9 vaccine protects against nine of the most cancer-associated strains of...

Conducting research: Exploring charge flow through proteins

March 4, 2019 | News

Among the zoo of biomolecules essential to life, proteins are the most startlingly varied and versatile. These complex structures, generated from the DNA code and built from some 20 amino acids play a central role in innumerable life processes. In the form of antibodies, proteins defend organisms from infectious agents like bacteria and viruses. As enzymes, protein molecules speed up chemical reactions necessary to sustain life.  Proteins also act as messengers that coordinate disparate...

Life’s many histories open new approaches to cancer

February 26, 2019 | News

For most humans, a family of ten would be considered abundant. But for many other forms of life on earth, that’s.. well…chicken feed. Take the ocean sunfish for example. At spawning time, a female will commonly disgorge some 300 million eggs into her liquid habitat, which are subsequently fertilized externally. Only a tiny fraction of these eggs will hatch and survive. The resulting fry, each the size of a pinhead, can eventually grow to the proportions of a rhinocersos. Why do...

Arizona experts fight to disrupt dementia

February 25, 2019 | News

TEMPE, Ariz. (Feb. 25, 2019) – Arizona has the second-highest growth rate for Alzheimer’s disease in the United States. Researchers, scientists and other community experts are working together to disrupt dementia and end Alzheimer’s disease before losing another generation. Tempe Mayor Mark Mitchell initiated Dementia Friendly Tempe in 2016 to help make the city a livable community for people with dementia and their care partners. Join experts as they highlight why there is hope now and...

ASU, NAU, University of Texas at Austin awarded $1.5 M from ARPA-E to transform energy technology

February 21, 2019 | News

New low-cost carbon capture concept that pulls CO2 directly from air has potential to revolutionize energy technology Tempe, Ariz. – Researchers at Arizona State University, in partnership with collaborators at The University of Texas at Austin and Northern Arizona University, have announced $1.5 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). The research team will demonstrate an entirely new direct air capture (DAC) concept...

Probing life’s simplest organism to understand the complexity of cancer

February 18, 2019 | News

The simplest multicellular animal known to man (Trichoplax adhaerens) has no nervous system, no muscle tissue, and, most importantly, no history of cancer. Typically, cancer is a disease afflicting multicellular organisms that spreads as cells grow and divide. Arizona State University researchers are looking to these small creatures to learn more about how they evade the deadly disease, and the implications this has for other multicellular animals. At the Biodesign Center for...

Hop to it: Researchers evaluate rabbits’ evolved resistance to myxoma virus

February 14, 2019 | News

As most know already, rabbit populations are not easily controlled – they reproduce swiftly, and as a result, they have a severe impact on their environment. This was the case when European settlers introduced the wild European rabbit to Australia in the late 19th century. In an attempt to reduce the population size that had grown to almost a billion rabbits by 1950, Australian scientists released the myxoma virus – a virus known to be deadly to rabbits at the time – to the rabbit...

Is your brain lying to you? What magicians can teach scientists about observation

February 13, 2019 | News

Observation is one of the most powerful tools that scientists use. Scientists meticulously perform experiments, analyze data and interpret the results, then repeat this process hundreds of times. But what if our brains are lying to us? Can scientists trust their observations? Parag Mallick, a computer scientist and researcher at Stanford Medicine and a world-renowned magician, explored these questions during a recent visit to Arizona State University. In “An Evening of Science and...

X-ray laser study identifies crystalline intermediate in our 'pathway to breathing'

February 11, 2019 | News

Scientists from Arizona State University’s School of Molecular Sciences, in collaboration with colleagues from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, have captured for the first time snapshots of crystal structures of intermediates in the biochemical pathway that enables us to breathe. Their results, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in the article "Snapshot of an Oxygen Intermediate in the Catalytic Reaction of Cytochrome c...

Quantum strangeness gives rise to new electronics

February 11, 2019 | News

Noting the startling advances in semiconductor technology, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore proposed that the number of transistors on a chip will double each year, an observation that has been born out since he made the claim in 1965. Still, it’s unlikely Moore could have foreseen the extent of the electronics revolution currently underway. Today, a new breed of devices, bearing unique properties, is being developed. As ultra-miniaturization continues apace, researchers have begun to explore...