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News

Biotech journal features researchers’ work two months in a row

September 12, 2018 | News

One of researchers’ main prerogatives is to receive recognition for their work in high-caliber journals – to be featured on the cover of a journal is an accolade that is highly sought after, but rarely received. To be featured on not just one cover but two covers is rare. Biodesign researchers managed to pull it off. Back-to-back discoveries by Biodesign research scientist Chen Zhou and his team graced the covers of the July and August issues of "Biotechnology and Bioengineering," a...

Farewell flat biology – tackling infectious disease using 3-D tissue engineering

September 10, 2018 | News

In a new invited review article, ASU Biodesign microbiologists and tissue engineers Cheryl Nickerson, Jennifer Barrila and colleagues discuss the development and application of three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture models as they pertain to infectious disease. They describe these models as predictive pre-clinical platforms to study host-pathogen interactions, infectious disease mechanisms, and antimicrobial drug development.   The review, entitled “Modeling Host-Pathogen...

Chokepoints and Censorship: Protecting the Free Flow of Information on the Internet

September 7, 2018 | News

When flying to Beijing, you’ll likely have to take multiple flights and pass through customs to get to your destination. If you’re searching for a Beijing hotel and visit its Chinese website, your request also travels multiple legs through internet networks, entering and exiting the territories of various countries on its way to the Chinese network hosting the website. And like customs and border patrol, there is a potential for governments to place digital filters on information...

Bruce Rittmann and Mark van Loosdrecht receive 2018 Stockholm Water Prize in Sweden

August 29, 2018 | News

Stockholm – Professors Bruce Rittmann and Mark van Loosdrecht received the 2018 Stockholm Water Prize on Wednesday for microbiological research and innovations that have revolutionized water and wastewater treatment. The prize was presented to them by H.R.H. Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden at a ceremony in Stockholm City Hall during World Water Week. The research of Rittmann from the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University and Mark van van Loosdrecht from Delft University of...

Smallpox: Could a vanquished foe return?

August 28, 2018 | News

Smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases in human history, has ancient roots. Detected in mummified remains dating to the Egyptian dynasties, the disease would eventually claim hundreds of millions of victims in the 20th century alone. As recently as 1967, smallpox was still killing around 15 million people annually. In 1980, however, the World Health Assembly declared smallpox officially eradicated, thanks to aggressive global vaccination efforts. This triumph is often cited as one of...

New $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to probe secrets of cell death in Alzheimer’s

August 21, 2018 | News

Most neurons in the human brain live out their lives, enduring the processes of aging before eventually dying. Some, however, choose a more violent route: suicide. In a new project, researchers hope to better understand a form of programmed cell death known as necroptosis, believed to play a crucial role in the massive destruction of neurons typical of Alzheimer’s disease. The new $3.2 million, 5-year grant from the National Institutes of Health, entitled Necroptosis as a novel...

First nationwide study shows the environmental costs of contact lenses

August 19, 2018 | Press Release

BOSTON, August 19, 2018 – Every year, about 45 million Americans rely on contact lenses to see the world more clearly. This $2.7 billion U.S. market has made contact lenses more comfortable and disposable.  Every day, these plastic lenses are tossed away by consumers in various ways, perhaps without much thought to their ultimate environmental fate. Now, Arizona State University scientists are reporting the first nationwide study that shows consumers, by discarding used...

Biodesign Institute researcher interviewed on PBS' Arizona Horizon

August 8, 2018 | News

Carlo Maley, a Biodesign Institute researcher and a professor in the School of Life Sciences, was recently interviewed on Arizona PBS' Arizona Horizon. Host Ted Simons talked to Maley about the new Arizona Cancer Evolution Center, which is a new center that aims to attack cancer through groundbreaking, interdisciplinary approaches, including looking at cancer through an evolutionary lens. Arizona State University researchers received an $8.5 million grant from the National Cancer...

Biodesign names new associate director of development

August 7, 2018 | News

Abby Elsener, who recently served as the assistant director of development for Health@ASU, has joined the Biodesign Institute as the associate director of development. In her role as associate director of development, Elsener will collaborate with colleagues, volunteers and academic leaders to identify and cultivate philanthropic relationships that build upon the momentum in annual and planned giving. In partnership with the ASU Foundation and Biodesign Institute leadership, she will also...

Biodesign research surges ahead

August 6, 2018 | News

Highlights of Biodesign's research achievements in the past year reinforce the institute's commitment to the highest standards of scientific excellence and reiterate its devotion to pursuing solutions in human and planetary health.  Research achievements and accolades in the past year include: Qiang “Shawn” Chen led his research team to develop the world’s first plant-based Zika vaccine in response to the Zika outbreak of 2015.  Alex Green demonstrated how...