News

News

When your major is just the starting point

September 1, 2017 | News

3 ASU faculty aren't doing what they originally set out to — and their lives are better, and more interesting, for it Education is what’s left after you’ve forgotten what you learned in school, Albert Einstein said. Curiosity and learning how to learn — what some call being a master learner — are far more powerful indicators of success than a choice of major. A specific field of study might just be a stepping stone to something else. Only 51 percent of college graduates...

ASU scientist scores major victory with FDA

August 28, 2017 | News

Upcoming ban on personal-care products containing prominent antimicrobials a direct result of Rolf Halden's research. Arizona State University scientist Rolf Halden jokes that his real job is to scare the public, but in the course of his work he has made the public healthier. Starting at the beginning of September, the Food and Drug Administration will prohibit the sale of personal-care products containing prominent antimicrobials, including triclosan and triclocarban — prized for their...

ASU team shines new light on photosynthesis

August 28, 2017 | News

A team of scientists from ASU’s School of Molecular Sciences and Pennsylvania State University has taken us a step closer to unlocking the secrets of photosynthesis, and possibly to cleaner fuels. Their discovery was recently published online in Science and describes the structure of a reaction center (from a heliobacterium) which preserves the characteristics of the ancestral one, and so provides new insight into the evolution of photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is the most...

ASU/Biodesign Researchers enter race for early Alzheimer’s test

August 24, 2017 | News

According to Paul Coleman, an Alzheimer’s researcher at the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center (NDRC), one of the greatest difficulties plaguing efforts to find effective treatments for Alzheimer’s is the enormous lag between the disease’s inception and the appearance of clinical symptoms. In a new study, Coleman and his colleagues demonstrate the promise of an early  blood test for Alzheimer’s disease. The results suggest that Alzheimer’s can be detected...

Now showing: 3D movie of a virus in action

August 14, 2017 | News

A research collaboration led by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee has for the first time created a three-dimensional movie showing a virus preparing to infect a healthy cell. The research promises to help advance our understanding of changes that viruses undergo during infection. This could lead to better therapeutic treatments and prevention of viral diseases when applied to studies of viruses that infect humans and other hosts. The feat was made possible by UWM physicists, who...

Scientists develop improved, potentially safer Zika vaccine

August 9, 2017 | Press Release

Tobacco plant produced vaccine could also be less costly, targeted for the developing world The worldwide Zika threat first emerged in 2015, infecting millions as it swept across the Americas. It struck great fear in pregnant women, as babies born with severe brain birth defects quickly overburdened hospitals and public health care systems. In response, there has been a flurry of heroic scientific efforts to stop Zika.  Whole governments, academic labs and pharmaceutical companies...

Restoring loss: Bio-inspired materials boost regenerative medicine

August 8, 2017 | News

Technology could one day help treat diseases including stroke, heart attacks, Parkinson’s and arthritis What if one day, we could teach our bodies to self-heal like a lizard’s tail and make severe injury or disease no more threatening than a paper cut? Or heal tissues by coaxing cells to multiply, repair or replace damaged regions in loved ones whose lives have been ravaged by stroke, Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease? Such is the vision, promise and excitement in the...

ASU study reveals ways to keep you healthier on planes

August 7, 2017 | News

Researchers say factors like plane size and boarding method can have a huge impact on infection rates Air travel may be the quickest way to get to your vacation destination, but it’s also one of the speediest ways for infectious diseases to spread between people, cities and countries. So when patient zero — or a sneezing toddler — makes it onto the plane, what will minimize your chances of getting sick? An Arizona State University team that includes School of Human Evolution...

Eric Reiman: aiming to prevent Alzheimer's disease

August 3, 2017 | News

What will it take to prevent Alzheimer's disease by 2025? Eric Reiman, Executive Director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix (Arizona, USA), has an answer. “It will take the right prevention trials, methods, and enrollment strategies to rapidly test, find and approve prevention therapies in people at genetic or biomarker risk. It will take shared urgency, courage and commitment, new collaborative models, and extensive data sharing. It will take a multi-faceted approach to optimize...

Teaching kids to be #SciComm filmmakers

July 27, 2017 | News

A Google search of the hashtag #SciComm will produce countless examples of scientists, artists, and teachers discussing the rapidly-growing field of Science Communication. Thanks to camera phones, social media and user-friendly video editing software, science lovers are increasingly embracing online media as a platform for broadcasting and engaging around new discoveries. Andrew Maynard is a professor at Arizona State University’s School for the Future of Innovation in...