News

News

Mayo Clinic, ASU collaborate to seed and accelerate research

December 18, 2017 | News

In Silicon Valley, investors flock to back potentially disruptive new technology and apps — even if they are still in development. But the funding landscape is a little different for health research. Although novel ideas have great potential to radically improve health care and medicine, funding agencies usually choose to fund well-established research. This can be a barrier for researchers with new ideas. Together, Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic are addressing this challenge and...

Sugar-coated world

December 18, 2017 | News

Sugar-coated world Glycans are essential to virtually every biological process in the body. These complex structures—composed of interlocking sugar molecules—adorn the surfaces of cells in fuzzy profusion. Glycans are a crucial part of a cell’s identity, helping it communicate with other cells and with the external environment. Glycans are also known to play a vital role in cancer, autoimmune disease and countless other afflictions. Despite their ubiquity and importance, glycans...

Sneak peek inside ASU's Biodesign C expansion under construction

December 15, 2017 | News

Biodesign C, the $120 million building expansion of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, continues to rise along Rural Road at ASU’s Tempe campus. Much of the building is now in place ahead of an April 2018 completion date. Biodesign staff recently toured the construction site for a sneak peek at the progress, and the project architects explained the building’s layout, infrastructure and appearance at a seminar in November. It is the third building at ASU’s 14-acre...

ASU scientists develop new, rapid pipeline for antimicrobials

December 14, 2017 | Press Release

High-throughput technology can go from idea to discovery to stockpiling 1,000 doses within a week With hospitals more often reaching for antibiotics of last resort to fight infections and recent Ebola and Zika outbreaks crossing borders like never before, the worldwide scientific community has been challenged with developing new antimicrobials to safeguard the population.   The research arm of the U.S. Department of Defense, the Defense Advanced Research Program Agency, or...

Spaghetti-like, DNA “noodle origami” the new shape of things to come for nanotechnology

December 14, 2017 | Press Release

May one day revolutionize medicine by making and delivering drugs inside cells For the past few decades, scientists have been inspired by the molecule of life, DNA, as the shape of things to come for nanotechnology. This burgeoning field is called DNA origami. Scientists borrowed its moniker from the paper artists who conjure up birds, flowers and planes from imaginatively folding a single sheet of paper. Similarly, DNA origami scientists are dreaming up a variety of shapes ---at a...

National Academy of Inventors announces pair of ASU researchers as 2017 NAI Fellows

December 13, 2017 | Press Release

Stephen Albert Johnston and Deirdre R. Meldrum honored Stephen Albert Johnston and Deirdre R. Meldrum of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University have been named Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), the organization has announced. Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional accolade bestowed solely to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible...

New imaging technology peers deep into the unfathomed 3D world of living single cells to advance disease diagnostics

December 6, 2017 | Press Release

Medical imaging technology like MRIs and CT scans have revolutionized the way patients are diagnosed with injuries and disease by enabling doctors to non-invasively look beneath the patient’s skin. Now, similar imaging advances may soon propel discoveries for the biomedical research community with a new technology ---called live-cell, CT (or LCCT) --- that was recently developed by a team of ASU inventors to enable biologists to explore the inside of living, single cells. With a premise...

Biodesign Institute opens labs to Arizona’s Chief Science Officer students for one-of-a-kind event

December 1, 2017 | News

Nearly 60 middle and high school students spent a special day meeting with scientific mentors and touring the state-of-the-art research laboratories up close at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University on November 28. The students are part of Arizona’s Chief Science Officers (CSO) program, elected by their peers at school to serve as advocates for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education. The CSO movement aims to get more young people interested and involved in...

Community support: Dorothy Foundation donates to project to diagnose pancreatic cancer earlier

November 17, 2017 | News

Last year, pancreatic cancer overtook breast cancer as the third leading cause of cancer deaths. With a five-year survival rate of just 8 percent, it is one of the most deadly forms of cancer. But with early detection, that survival rate rises to 60 percent, even with conventional treatments. That’s why the Dorothy Foundation donated $25,000 to a project led by Stephen Johnston, director of the Biodesign Center for Innovations in Medicine and professor at the ASU School of Life...

Genome fidelity and its consequences for cellular health

November 16, 2017 | News

Non-inherited, chance mutations may also provide a new window into understanding human disease  It’s biology’s version of the whisper game.  Inside a cell, every DNA phrase or sentence that makes a protein, known as a gene, first must be precisely copied, to ensure its instructions can properly build the foundation of life. But much like children tasked in the game with faithfully whispering a phrase to one another, each time, there is the possibility of introducing errors...