News

News

World's Fastest Movies Capture Molecules in Motion

May 8, 2017 | News

In the latest issue of Scientific American, ASU researchers Petra Fromme and John Spence take readers on a world wind tour of their powerful X-ray science, where “new movies of drug proteins or photosynthesis in action, shot in millionths of a billionth of a second, show how the molecules work—or fail.”   It’s a world where “proteins are in constant motion, carrying out the reactions that make life possible. These movements happen on a scale too small, and too fast, to be seen...

Bringing science to life through art

April 28, 2017 | Press Release

An Arizona State University semesterlong fusion experiment that paired artists from the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts with scientists from the Biodesign Institute culminated in a one-night-only performance of “Science Exposed: Bringing Science to Life through the Arts.” The evening kicked off with a chamber musical alchemy from two compositions by graduate students Zachary Bush and Stephen Mitton, as they interpreted the daily struggles of Alzheimer’s patients, caregivers...

Ancient stress response provides clues to cancer resistance

April 25, 2017 | Press Release

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica} Cancer is often able to craftily outwit the best techniques modern medicine has developed to treat it. In an attempt to understand and combat cancer’s vaunted prowess, an unusual collaboration between physicists and a leading geneticist has cast new light on cancer as a biological phenomenon with very deep evolutionary roots. Paul Davies, Ph.D., ASU Regents’ Professor and Director of the Beyond Center for Fundamental...

ASU researchers recognized as changemakers by MacArthur Foundation

April 20, 2017 | News

Three ASU professors were recently highlighted by the MacArthur Foundation and recognized as "changemakers" during MacArthur's $100 million, “100&Change” grant competition.   ASU’s Rolf Halden, Leah Gerber and Rimjhim Aggarwal were recognized as "top 200" entries among the nearly thousand applicants in the competition.   This year’s competition was unusual in the fact that the MacArthur Foundation changed their grant making approach to have a big impact on...

ASU Biodesign Institute employees hold second annual 'Seeing Science' photo contest

April 19, 2017 | News

ASU Biodesign Institute researchers and staff used the power of digital photography to share their work through a photo contest called "Seeing Science." From the microscopic to the macroscopic, images of science’s wonders present a creative view of an analytical discipline. Out of more than 90 entries, winners were selected in four categories: Best Microscopy, Best Science as Art, Best Science in Nature and General Photography. A Best of Show, People's Choice and...

Cave-in: How blind species evolve

April 17, 2017 | News

Why do animals that live in caves become blind? This question has long intrigued scientists and been the subject of hot debate. Clearly, across the animal kingdom, blindness has evolved repeatedly.  There are thousands of underground and cave-dwelling species, from naked mole rats to bats, found throughout nature.  Many of these species have lost their sense of sight.  Charles Darwin originally suggested that eyes could be lost by “disuse” over time. Now, Reed...

ASU researcher offers solution for early pancreatic cancer detection

April 11, 2017 | News

Early detection is the key to successful treatment of any type of cancer. With pancreatic cancer, however, it’s even more critical. According to the American Cancer Society, four out of five people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer die within one year. One ASU researcher, however, hopes to change this grim prognosis with a new early detection tool. Tony Hu, an associate professor at ASU’s Biodesign Institute, uses an innovative strategy to analyze blood samples for a specific pancreatic...

X-Ray Study Reveals Long-Sought Insights Into Potential Drug Target

April 5, 2017 | News

Researchers hope to design a new generation of drugs against an array of deadly diseases. The task, however, is costly, arduous and often ineffective. One of the key challenges is understanding a particular class of proteins adorning cell surfaces, which are the targets of the majority of pharmaceutical drugs. Now Wei Liu and his colleagues at ASU’s Biodesign Institute, along with a team led by Haitao Zhang and Vadim Cherezov of USC have examined one promising drug target in luminous...

ASU appoints Josh LaBaer, M.D., Ph.D., as new executive director

March 30, 2017 | Press Release

Arizona State University announced today that Joshua LaBaer, M.D., Ph.D., a leading researcher in cancer and personalized medicine, has been appointed the new executive director of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, effective April 1, 2017. “Josh’s solutions-oriented research and innovative leadership make him uniquely qualified to guide the Biodesign Institute on its revolutionary path,” said Michael M. Crow, ASU president. “In many ways, Josh’s career trajectory...

‘Science Exposed’: Performance art meets science in experimental collaboration

March 29, 2017 | News

Artist vs. scientist. Right vs. left brain. Creativity vs. stark logic. When the seemingly separate worlds of art and science collide, will they produce chaos or a masterwork? This semester, in a new “Science Exposed: Bringing Science to Life through the Arts” initiative, a dozen of ASU’s Herberger Institute artists and Biodesign Institute scientists are about to find out what happens when art and science collide. Three diverse projects now underway may give audiences pause and...