News

News

Founding director of ASU’s Biodesign Institute, Charles Arntzen, retires

November 9, 2017 | Press Release

Arntzen's creative science leads to discovery of Ebola antidote   From his roots as a fair-haired Minnesota farm boy to climbing the ladder of success in big pharma to blazing a translational academic research path into life-saving therapies, Charles Arntzen has led one extraordinary life in science.  During the course of a prolific career, Arntzen and his collaborators have gained international recognition and helped burnish a special shine on ASU’s star with their dedicated...

Biodesign tent wows students and families at ASU Homecoming

November 2, 2017 | News

The Biodesign Institute welcomed nearly 1,600 guests to “Science is the Force,” its Star Wars-themed tent at the 2017 ASU Homecoming block party. The tent, one of Biodesign’s signature outreach events, featured five hands-on science experiences inspired by the Star Wars series and Biodesign research. Visitors had the chance to make midichlorian coasters with nature’s fractal patterns, learn Jedi secrets about scientific discoveries and watch Wookie toothpaste form as a reaction to a...

As NSF grant ends, ASU-led Sustainable Phosphorus Alliance continues to grow

November 1, 2017 | News

Following a five-year National Science Foundation grant, the Sustainable Phosphorus Alliance continues to grow to take on the phosphorus problem in the global food system. Phosphorus, a basic element found in all living things, enables modern agriculture as a key component of most fertilizers. But phosphorus also poses a serious threat to the environment. Phosphorus runoff contaminates rivers, lakes, and streams, providing an overabundance of nutrients that leads to toxic algal blooms. “We...

Diagnostic revolution targets tuberculosis, other deadly diseases

October 31, 2017 | Press Release

Skeletal remains dating to the Neolithic era in Egypt bear tell-tale traces of tuberculosis (TB)—a disease that is estimated to have killed a billion people in the last two centuries alone. The bacteria responsible for TB can lurk in a person’s lung tissue for decades before producing active, infectious TB disease and it is estimated that a third of the global population may have such dormant infections, with 5 percent to 10 percent progressing to active disease. Detecting TB is...

Munk appointed deputy director of ASU’s Biodesign Institute

October 31, 2017 | Press Release

Stephen Munk has joined the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University as deputy director, science and technology. In this role, Munk will focus on the strategic, business and technical operations of Arizona’s single largest bioscience research infrastructure investment. Most recently, Munk was president and CEO of Ash Stevens Inc., Riverview, Mich., a pharmaceutical development and manufacturing company, where he became known for his success in gaining rapid FDA approval for novel...

Scientists show that a protein can be switched on and off to conduct electricity like a metal

October 27, 2017 | Press Release

When pushing the boundaries of discovery, sometimes even the most experienced of scientists can get a surprise jolt from a completely unpredictable result. That was the case for ASU Regents’ Professor and biophysicist Stuart Lindsay, who has spent his career building new microscopes that have become the eyes of nanotechnology and next-generation, rapid and low-cost DNA and amino acid readers to make precision medicine more of a reality. In the process, Lindsay’s research team has...

ASU team turns smartphone into a powerful microscope in the fight against infectious diseases

October 26, 2017 | News

With smartphones millions of times more powerful than the NASA Apollo computers that sent us to the moon in the 1960s, scientists have been eager to adapt them back here on Earth to better the planet. That’s exactly what ASU Biodesign Institute researcher Tony Hu and postdoctoral researcher Dali Sun have recently demonstrated in the fight against infectious diseases. They’ve developed a simple mobile technology for clinics, hospitals and health organizations that are on the front...

Cancer through the lens of evolution

October 23, 2017 | News

“What does not kill me, makes me stronger.” The oft-repeated maxim, (from Nietzsche’s Twilight of the Idols), offers a model of human fortitude. It could also serve as the motto of a cancer cell, emphasizing—with brutal precision—how treatment-resistant cancers outwit our best medical interventions.  Cancer owes its ability to colonize and devastate the body to the same Darwinian forces that have shaped all life on earth: chance mutation and natural selection....

Drawing blood from a stone: photosynthetic microbiomes found to live on carbon source of the rocks they excavate

October 20, 2017 | News

A little sunlight, water and carbon dioxide. That is all it takes to keep cyanobacteria --the miniature versions of plants--- happy. For this, they use carbon fixation, one of the most important reactions on Earth, turning carbon dioxide into sugars, fats and proteins needed to grow and thrive, while giving humans and the rest of animals a precious byproduct: the oxygen in the air we breathe.   While land plants get most of their carbon dioxide from the air, aquatic microalgae...

Biodesign researchers featured in breast cancer foundation's national campaign

October 18, 2017 | News

The Breast Cancer Research Foundation funds more than 275 researchers across 15 countries and six continents. Biodesign Institute executive director Joshua LaBaer, M.D., Ph.D., was asked to play a prominent role in BCRF’s international awareness campaign. As a BCRF grant recipient, LaBaer was selected for his work in identifying genes that are especially important on particularly aggressive types of breast cancer – and for his personal advocacy for breast cancer research: LaBaer's own...