News

News

ASU engineer working to develop disposable point-of-care sensor

June 5, 2017 | Press Release

As an electrical engineer, Associate Professor Jennifer Blain Christen has spent a good portion of her career dabbling in different fields. Her enthusiasm for exploring new and different ways of applying electrical engineering earned her the funding to leverage her expertise to create an innovative new diagnostic tool. The project aims to develop a disposable, point-of-care biosensor for rapid diagnosis and health monitoring, supported by a four-year, $1.8 million Smart and Connected...

Desert oceanographer explores tiniest of ocean plants as nature’s carbon “pumps”

June 5, 2017 | Press Release

While millions of travelers will frolic on the beach during their summer vacations, most are blissfully unaware of the billions of microscopic plants making ocean life---and our lives---possible. These microscopic creatures, known as phytoplankton ---not only help support the ocean’s food chain---but also act as a vital carbon sink to buffer the oceans during eras of climate change. This has long fascinated ASU oceanographer Susanne Neuer, Ph.D., who wants to further explore how these...

Dramatic shift in gut microbes and their metabolites seen after weight loss surgery

May 26, 2017 | Press Release

Obesity, already a global epidemic, is on the rise. Over one third of the U.S. population is currently afflicted, according to the Centers for Disease Control and the monetary costs alone are approaching $150 billion dollars annually. Causes of the epidemic include changing diets and greater sedentism, though environmental factors may also contribute. A new study compares the two most common surgical therapies for obesity, known as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), and laparoscopic adjustable...

Sustainable Phosphorus Alliance hosts first conference

May 19, 2017 | News

As agribusiness grows to feed an increasing global population, so do concerns about the sustainability of current agricultural practices. The use of phosphorus in big agriculture is one such practice which has come under the microscope of sustainability experts. The element is a common ingredient in plant fertilizer and animal feed and is an essential building block for life, however, an overabundance of phosphorus can leak toxins into the environment. Researchers have long been aware...

Research opens the door to improved drugs for Type II diabetes

May 17, 2017 | Press Release

Type 2 diabetes, a prolific killer, is on a steep ascent. According to the World Health Organization, the incidence of the condition has grown dramatically from 108 million cases in 1980 to well over 400 million today. The complex disease occurs when the body’s delicate regulation of glucose, a critical metabolite, is disrupted, creating a condition of elevated blood sugar known hyperglycemia. Over time, the condition can damage the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. In a new...

Is the world ready for another Ebola outbreak?

May 17, 2017 | News

A new Ebola outbreak in remote areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo has some public health officials on guard for larger outbreaks to come, but Arizona State University’s Charles Arntzen, who played a crucial role in development of the Ebola therapeutic drug called ZMapp, says the current outbreak is small and there are a number of fledgling drugs that can be used to fight it and vaccinate the people in local areas. Q:  What do you know about the current Ebola outbreak in the...

ASU postdoc awarded Alfred P. Sloan Foundation - NASA joint fellowship to study International Space Station microbes

May 16, 2017 | News

Arizona State University has received new support from the prestigious Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and NASA for its rising research stars to study the microbiome of the built environment on board the International Space Station (ISS).  ASU Biodesign Institute postdoctoral researcher Jiseon Yang was just one of five scientists chosen from across the country for a fellowship award from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation under a joint call with NASA – “Microbes of the Built Environment...

ASU professor’s environmental toxins research translates into public health benefits

May 15, 2017 | News

For Rolf Halden, every day is Earth Day. In fact, you may be hard-pressed to find a professional willing to dirty his hands so much to help the earth and its inhabitants. Halden is the director of the Center for Environmental Security at ASU’s Biodesign Institute. He studies wastewater from U.S. cities to zero in on potentially harmful chemicals found in personal products used by millions of Americans. The professor brings expertise in identifying exactly what chemicals we come in...

$2.7M NIH award allows ASU professor to extend potential benefits of rapid TB test to children

May 12, 2017 | Press Release

Recently, a new Arizona State University invention by ASU Biodesign Institute researcher Tony Hu has resulted in the development of the world’s fastest and most accurate blood test for tuberculosis (TB). The test can provide new hope to physicians in the treatment of people infected with TB, with results in a just few hours instead of the week or two it currently takes with traditional methods. This new test, which Hu hopes to bring to the market soon, means patients who might have waited...

ASU’s carbon capture and delivery technology garners algae industry award

May 11, 2017 | News

What if rather than using fossil fuels that add carbon dioxide, we could create renewable biofuels that recycle carbon dioxide from the atmosphere? That’s the concept behind a new invention from Arizona State University researchers that recently garnered industry recognition as the “Gold Medal” Award Winner in the Laboratory Equipment Category from the Algae Industry Magazine’s 2017 International Readers’ Poll. Klaus Lackner, teamed with Arizona State University Biodesign...