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News

Biodesign C building designated Best of the Best Project nationwide

January 17, 2019 | News

Arizona State University’s Biodesign C building was recently awarded as the national Best of the Best Project in the Higher Education/Research category by ENR (Engineering News Record), a publication focusing on engineering and construction news. Approximately 200 projects were considered for the honor, spanning 10 regions across America. “Biodesign C is an impressive structure, and the work that is taking place inside is impressive as well,” said Joshua LaBaer, executive director of...

What is Clean Breathing Water?

January 16, 2019 | News

PHILADELPHIA (January 16, 2019) ­­– “Don’t drink the water” might be good enough advice to keep you from getting sick in some places, but according to researchers from Arizona State and Drexel University, the admonition should probably be expanded to “…try not to breathe the water either.” In research recently published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, the group takes a closer look at how the spray from showers, sinks and toilets can expose us to the...

ASU’s Biodesign Institute and Banner Research announce neuroscience scholars summer program

January 10, 2019 | News

If understanding the inner workings of the brain is on your mind, now is the time to explore the Banner-ASU Neuroscience Scholars program. Top-achieving college undergraduate and graduate science students are eligible to apply for the paid eight-week training program. Applications must be received by March 1. Students selected for the program will work side-by-side with some of the world’s most talented scientists, clinicians and researchers in an environment devoted to neuroscientific...

ASU researchers address a primary cause of treatment failure for pancreatic cancer

January 10, 2019 | News

As the second leading cause of death worldwide, cancer is a focal point in both clinical research and health care fields, but not all cancers are created equal. While some cancers are now much less deadly due to recent medical advances, other aggressive cancers remain highly resistant to currently available therapies. This therapy resistance is a leading cause of cancer-associated death. Pancreatic cancer is an extreme example of this effect, and therapy resistance is a major reason why only...

Better drug to save mothers’ lives during childbirth may be on the way

January 9, 2019 | News

Postpartum bleeding is the world’s leading cause of death for women during and after childbirth, and the third-leading cause in the United States alone. Many doctors in developing countries have turned to the drug misoprostol to save more women from deadly hemorrhaging. Misoprostol, although affordable, has dangerous side effects, including uterine cramping, heart attack, toxicity in the brain and spinal cord, fetal death and fetal heart abnormalities. Development of a...

Protecting U.S. elections against attack: What’s biology have to do with it?

January 8, 2019 | News

Most of us think of cybersecurity and biology as distinct areas of study. To better understand how we might apply principles of immunology to developing safeguards against cyber attacks, researchers are looking to ways in which the immune system of humans and other mammals naturally combats pathogens. In the first “Dialogues in Complexity” lecture, national experts will present their insights related to this emerging field of study. “Protecting against Bad Actors: From Election...

Essential nutrient may help fight Alzheimer’s across generations

January 8, 2019 | News

In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Institute explore a safe and simple treatment for one of the most devastating and perplexing afflictions: Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Lead authors Ramon Velazquez and Salvatore Oddo, along with their colleagues in the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center (NDRC), investigate the effects of choline, an important nutrient that may hold promise in the war against the memory-stealing disorder. The study focuses on mice bred to...

DNA on auto-pilot

January 3, 2019 | News

Nature has made extravagant use of a simple molecule—DNA, the floorplan of all earthly life. Inventive researchers have used the same base-pairing properties that bond two strands of DNA into the familiar double helix to build innumerable useful structures at the nanometer scale. One such method, known as DNA origami, has yielded rich results in recent years, enabling the construction of a rapidly growing menagerie of 2- and 3-dimensional objects, with far-flung applications in material...

Experts wrestle with today’s tough biotechnology questions at third Arizona Biosecurity Workshop

December 18, 2018 | News

Given the enormous attention recently trained on a Chinese scientist who performed a gene editing experiment on human twins, interest in scientific protocol, responsibility and biosecurity is at an all-time high. Attendance at the third annual Arizona Biosecurity Workshop, held at Arizona State University, Dec. 13 and 14 was certainly evidence of the fierce current debate. At the event, the biggest questions revolved around the threats, opportunities and responsibilities tied to emerging...

Defining Quality Virus Data

December 17, 2018 | News

Microbes in, on and around the planet are said to outnumber the stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. The total number of viruses is expected to vastly exceed even that calculation. Arvind Varsani, a researcher in the Biodesign Center for Fundamental and Applied Microbiomics has hunted these elusive entities in far-flung locales, from the Pacific Islands and Amazonian jungles to Antarctic ice floes. In a new report, he joins an international group of researchers attempting to establish more...