News

News

Origins of world’s first cure for Ebola had roots at ASU

August 22, 2019 | News

High-risk, creative plant-based therapeutic program led to discovery of Ebola antidote Recently, dramatic news came out of Africa concerning Ebola, one of the world’s deadliest and most feared diseases. New drugs can overcome the virus and save lives. Health officials from the World Health Organization (WHO) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced that four antidotes — including one first developed by Arizona State University and its commercial partners — had been tested...

Researchers offer new strategies for the use of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers

August 21, 2019 | News

With advances in technology and our understanding of the human body, come better techniques for diagnosing disease. One recent innovation involves the use of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers for a range of illnesses. Extracellular vesicles are tiny bubbles of material emitted from most living cells that can offer vital clues about the status of the cells producing them. However, the field of extracellular vesicle (EV) research is a relatively new one, and there are more refinements to be...

ASU and USF investigators collaborate to explain where DNA repairs occur most frequently

August 15, 2019 | News

From hair and eye color to how our biological system is regulated, the blueprint of life is held in the genome. The gene also is what provides the instructions to the DNA as to what proteins to make and when, but our DNA is under constant attack from our environment — sun exposure, the air we breathe, the foods we eat and the body’s own metabolic processes to sustain life. If the enzymes that repair DNA are not signaled, damaged DNA may affect cell division and may result in the...

ASU researchers use new tools of data science to capture single molecules in action

August 14, 2019 | News

In high school chemistry, we all learned about chemical reactions. But what brings two reacting molecules together? As explained to us by Albert Einstein, it is the random motion of inert molecules driven by the bombardment of solvent molecules. If brought close enough together, by random chance, these molecules may react. Capturing the motion of single molecules is achieved by a method known as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The catch? It takes many detections of light...

New drug targets early instigator of Alzheimer’s disease

August 14, 2019 | News

Over a hundred years after they were first identified, two ominous signposts of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remain central topics of research—both formed by sticky accumulations of protein in the brain. Amyloid beta solidifies into senile plaques, which congregate in the extracellular spaces of nerve tissue, while tau protein creates tangled forms crowding the bodies of neurons. Plaques and tangles, considered classic hallmarks of AD, have been the objects of fierce debate, sustained...

Nature Research and the Biodesign Institute to co-host fall conference on imaging molecular reactions

August 13, 2019 | News

Some of the world’s most accomplished scientific minds will converge on Arizona State University’s Tempe campus on November 6, 7 and 8 to explore new methods that make it possible to observe molecules in action. Illustrating the adage, "seeing is believing," the conference, “Functional dynamics – visualizing molecules in action,” will showcase how cutting-edge methods are pushing the boundaries of knowledge. At the conference, scientists will discuss how emerging methods – that...

Meet the Promising New Researchers Making Waves on the Space Station

August 8, 2019 | News

Each year, the president of the United States selects an elite group of scientists and engineers at the beginning of their independent research careers to receive the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. This is the highest honor given by the U.S. government to outstanding science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professionals at this point in their professions. This year’s selection of 314 scientists includes 18 NASA researchers. Although these...

New ‘liquid biopsy’ blood test improves breast cancer diagnostics

August 7, 2019 | News

 A new type of blood test for breast cancer could help avoid thousands of unnecessary surgeries and otherwise precisely monitor disease progression, according to a study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), Mayo Clinic in Arizona and the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University. TGen is an affiliate of City of Hope, which along with Cambridge University also contributed to this study. Published today in the premier journal Science Translational...

Cancer without end? Discovery yields fresh insights

August 1, 2019 | News

If there is any consolation to be found in cancer, it may be that the devastating disease dies with the individual carrying it. Or so it had long been assumed. Recent research however has uncovered some forms of cancer that are transmissible, jumping from one host to another. Indeed, one such contagious cancer, known as canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT), has managed to persist in dogs for thousands of years. In a new commentary appearing in the August 2nd issue of the journal...

ASU researchers discover more than 100 viruses in honeybees

July 31, 2019 | News

With bee populations on the decline, researchers have a growing interest in the viruses that may be affecting them. However, with the exception of a few well-known viruses, very little is known about virus populations in bees. A team of researchers in Arizona State University’s School of Life Sciences, led by a collaboration between the labs of life sciences professors Arvind Varsani and Brian Smith, decided to change that by conducting the first ever mass genomic study...