News

News

Built for speed: DNA nanomachines take a (rapid) step forward

May 7, 2018 | News

When it comes to matching simplicity with staggering creative potential, DNA may hold the prize. Built from an alphabet of just four nucleic acids, DNA provides the floorplan from which all earthly life is constructed. But DNA’s remarkable versatility doesn’t end there. Researchers have managed to coax segments of DNA into performing a host of useful tricks. DNA sequences can form logical circuits for nanoelectronic applications. They have been used to perform sophisticated...

Climate change, environmental issues rarely covered in introductory science textbooks

April 30, 2018 | News

As an ASU graduate student, Rachel Yoho wanted to push the boundaries of renewable energy research. What she didn’t fully anticipate is that it would also lead her to questioning how climate change is taught in today’s universities. In the Biodesign Center for Environmental Biotechnology, led by director and ASU Regents’ Professor (and recent Stockholm Water Prize winner) Bruce Rittmann, she found a welcome home to make her research thrive. There, she focused on microbes that were...

Biodesign Institute Among Reasons Why Flinn Scholars Picked ASU

April 26, 2018 | News

Nik Dave has worked in Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute since he was a sophomore in high school. So when offered the opportunity to attend ASU with a full-ride scholarship, the decision was an easy one. The Horizon Honors senior was one of 22 high school students from the state of Arizona to receive the prestigious Flinn Scholarship, which has been valued at more than $120,000 this year.  The Flinn Scholarship aims to encourage the state's best students to attend either...

Biodesign research will be showcased on new Arizona PBS show ‘Catalyst’

April 25, 2018 | News

Cutting-edge research from the Biodesign Institute and all across Arizona State University will be showcased in a new prime-time series for Arizona PBS called “Catalyst.” The 13-episode series, which was created by students at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, will air every Wednesday, beginning April 25, at 9 p.m. The 30-minute show aims to demystify research and its impact on everyday life, and tells the stories of the scientists behind the research....

New findings point to new treatments for Parkinson’s Disease

April 25, 2018 | News

Parkinson’s disease (PD) affects 7-10 million people worldwide and is the leading movement-related disorder, causing progressive symptoms of rigidity and tremor. After Alzheimer’s, PD is the foremost neurodegenerative disease and efforts to prevent, treat or cure it have been arduous and frustrating. In a new study, Biodesign researchers at the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center, along with colleagues from Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, China, explore new...

ASU-UA-TGEN Startup Iluminos Licenses Treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease

April 25, 2018 | Press Release

Iluminos Therapeutics has licensed new compounds designed to treat neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer’s. Travis Dunckley, PhD, Assistant Research Professor at the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center helped develop the new therapies with lead inventor, Christopher Hulme, PhD, Professor of Medicinal Chemistry in the UA Department of Pharmacy and Toxicology (formerly at Eli Lilly and Amgen)  and Arthur Shaw, post-doctoral research fellow at the time. The...

‘Science Exposed’ Binds Passion for Science, Art through Creative Performances

April 9, 2018 | News

A scientist in a white lab coat greets you at the entryway of a corridor. She tells you about a light-sensitive experiment taking place and instructs you to take good visual notes. Inside the corridor, photosynthesis, in the form of a dancer in a sparkly silver jumpsuit, stands on a raised platform. She moves and poses while phrases that say “energy as electricity” and “to dance our energy” project on the wall next to her. At the end of the corridor, another dancer slinks out from...

Biodesign Faculty Athena Aktipis to Give Live Cancer Lecture at Harvard Museums

April 4, 2018 | News

Arizona State University Biodesign faculty Athena Aktipis will be speaking today at the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture on how using an evolutionary approach to understanding cancer can change how we treat the disease. The lecture will be livestreamed on the museum’s Facebook page. Aktipis, who is affiliated with the Biodesign Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy, will be discussing how evolution underlies the processes that lead cancer cells to grow and to become...

‘Science Exposed’ To Merge Art, Science to Increase Awareness

March 30, 2018 | News

For the second year in a row, scientists from Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute and artists from Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts have partnered for one-night-only performances of “Science Exposed: Bringing Science to Life through the Arts” that combine creativity, sound, dance and scientific curiosity. Nine scientists have teamed up with 18 students to create 13 innovative artistic collaborations that explore the effects of Lyme Disease, how opportunistic germs...

Peptides offer fresh insights for cancer diagnosis and treatment

March 28, 2018 | News

Genes and proteins play essential roles in the maintenance of health and the development of disease and are the focus of the fields of genomics and proteomics, respectively. Genes, which are composed of 4 nucleic acids, provide the blueprint for constructing all living forms, while proteins, which are composed of some 20 amino acids, are the body’s tireless day laborers, building organs and tissues, forming a complex defense network of antibodies, transporting essential materials to...