News

News

ASU/Biodesign Researchers enter race for early Alzheimer’s test

August 24, 2017 | News

According to Paul Coleman, an Alzheimer’s researcher at the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center (NDRC), one of the greatest difficulties plaguing efforts to find effective treatments for Alzheimer’s is the enormous lag between the disease’s inception and the appearance of clinical symptoms. In a new study, Coleman and his colleagues demonstrate the promise of an early  blood test for Alzheimer’s disease. The results suggest that Alzheimer’s can be detected...

Now showing: 3D movie of a virus in action

August 14, 2017 | News

A research collaboration led by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee has for the first time created a three-dimensional movie showing a virus preparing to infect a healthy cell. The research promises to help advance our understanding of changes that viruses undergo during infection. This could lead to better therapeutic treatments and prevention of viral diseases when applied to studies of viruses that infect humans and other hosts. The feat was made possible by UWM physicists, who...

Scientists develop improved, potentially safer Zika vaccine

August 9, 2017 | Press Release

Tobacco plant produced vaccine could also be less costly, targeted for the developing world The worldwide Zika threat first emerged in 2015, infecting millions as it swept across the Americas. It struck great fear in pregnant women, as babies born with severe brain birth defects quickly overburdened hospitals and public health care systems. In response, there has been a flurry of heroic scientific efforts to stop Zika.  Whole governments, academic labs and pharmaceutical companies...

Restoring loss: Bio-inspired materials boost regenerative medicine

August 8, 2017 | News

Technology could one day help treat diseases including stroke, heart attacks, Parkinson’s and arthritis What if one day, we could teach our bodies to self-heal like a lizard’s tail and make severe injury or disease no more threatening than a paper cut? Or heal tissues by coaxing cells to multiply, repair or replace damaged regions in loved ones whose lives have been ravaged by stroke, Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease? Such is the vision, promise and excitement in the...

ASU study reveals ways to keep you healthier on planes

August 7, 2017 | News

Researchers say factors like plane size and boarding method can have a huge impact on infection rates Air travel may be the quickest way to get to your vacation destination, but it’s also one of the speediest ways for infectious diseases to spread between people, cities and countries. So when patient zero — or a sneezing toddler — makes it onto the plane, what will minimize your chances of getting sick? An Arizona State University team that includes School of Human Evolution...

Eric Reiman: aiming to prevent Alzheimer's disease

August 3, 2017 | News

What will it take to prevent Alzheimer's disease by 2025? Eric Reiman, Executive Director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix (Arizona, USA), has an answer. “It will take the right prevention trials, methods, and enrollment strategies to rapidly test, find and approve prevention therapies in people at genetic or biomarker risk. It will take shared urgency, courage and commitment, new collaborative models, and extensive data sharing. It will take a multi-faceted approach to optimize...

Teaching kids to be #SciComm filmmakers

July 27, 2017 | News

A Google search of the hashtag #SciComm will produce countless examples of scientists, artists, and teachers discussing the rapidly-growing field of Science Communication. Thanks to camera phones, social media and user-friendly video editing software, science lovers are increasingly embracing online media as a platform for broadcasting and engaging around new discoveries. Andrew Maynard is a professor at Arizona State University’s School for the Future of Innovation in...

A new picture emerges on the origins of photosynthesis in a sun-loving bacteria

July 27, 2017 | News

Every day, enough sunlight hits the Earth to power the planet many times over---if only we could more efficiently capture all the energy. With today’s solar panels limited by their efficiency (currently, more than 80 percent of available solar energy is lost as heat), scientists have been looking into nature as inspiration to better understanding the way photosynthetic plants and bacteria capture sunlight. “Nature’s invention of photosynthesis is the single most important energy...

Living computers: RNA circuits transform cells into nanodevices

July 26, 2017 | Press Release

The interdisciplinary nexus of biology and engineering, known as synthetic biology, is growing at a rapid pace, opening new vistas that could scarcely be imagined a short time ago. In new research, Alex Green, a professor at ASU's Biodesign Institute, demonstrates how living cells can be induced to carry out computations in the manner of tiny robots or computers. The results of the new study have significant implications for intelligent drug design and smart drug delivery, green energy...

Study identifies new brain death pathway in Alzheimer’s disease

July 24, 2017 | News

Alzheimer’s disease tragically ravages the brains, memories and ultimately, personalities of its victims. Now affecting 5 million Americans, Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., and a cure for Alzheimer’s remains elusive, as the exact biological events that trigger it are still unknown. In a new study published today, Arizona State University-Banner Health neuroscientist Salvatore Oddo and his colleagues from Phoenix’s Translational Genomics Research...