Effects of Energy Extraction and Utilization on Source-water Bromide Concentration and Finished Drinking Water Risk

Effects of Energy Extraction and Utilization on Source-water Bromide Concentration and Finished Drinking Water Risk

September 27, 2018

Address

727 E. Tyler St.
Tempe, AZ 85281

Location

Biodesign Institute, Auditorium

Date and Time

October 18, 2018, 2:00 pm (Length: 1 hour 0 minutes)

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Jeanne VanBriesen, PhD, Duquesne Light Company Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University

Natural and anthropogenic sources of bromide can alter source waters in ways that affect drinking water quality and human health risk. Bromide, while unreactive in surface waters, interacts with treatment chemicals at the drinking water facility to produce halogenated organic compounds called disinfection byproducts (DBPs). DBPs containing bromide are more toxic and carcinogenic than chlorinated DBPs, and the current regulatory structure may not adequately protect drinking water consumers from this changing risk. Energy extraction and utilization activities produce wastewaters that are elevated in bromide. Several areas of the country not traditionally associated with high bromide have been reporting increasing bromination of DBPs in treated drinking water due to these new sources. The work is particularly timely as the U.S. EPA is reconsidering the Effluent Limitation Guidelines for Steam Electric Power Utilities, which currently do not require control of bromide discharges from flue gas desulfurization systems.