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Cancer connection: study of inflammation offers tantalizing clues

December 2, 2015 | Blog

The body displays a remarkable capacity for healing wounds— a process we often take for granted. Within a day, a finger we’ve carelessly nicked returns to normal. Behind the scenes, a crucial mediator of the body’s inflammatory response, a bioactive fat known as prostaglandin E2 or PGE2 swings into action, attracting the body’s immune cells and stimulating pathways that heal the wound site. Over a few days, depending on wound severity, levels of PGE2 rise and ebb,...

NPR Rescued A Chicken That Tried To Cross The Road...

November 10, 2015 | Blog

In Washington, D.C., today, NPR staffers rescued a beautiful, black-and-white hen that was darting about busy North Capitol Street by our headquarters. This demure urban chicken, who hung out in an NPR office in a mail crate with a bowl of water and granola bits, made us wonder about the lives of chickens in the low-income countries that our blog covers. To keep abreast, we turned to Jagdev Sharma, a research professor at Arizona State University who is well acquainted with the habits of...

Fromme garners Best of Phoenix award

October 21, 2015 | Blog

When one thinks of the best of nature photography, scientists usually don't spring to mind. But Biodesign's own Petra Fromme has channeled her inner Ansel Adams to win the Phoenix New Times' "Best Nature Photographer" of 2015 award.  From The New Times award feature excerpt: "Millions of stunning pictures have been taken by photographers attempting to capture the essence of the flowering desert. But none has done so at the level of Petra Fromme... who led an...

Finding the right work-life balance

September 10, 2015 | Blog

The long and arduous journey along the traditional academic career path can often be anything but the straight and narrow.  First there's graduate school. Rigorous coursework. Painstaking research. International competition. FINALLY, the dissertation! Next, a prestigious postdoctoral fellowship (or increasingly two, or even three and the eternal postdoc tract). Endless grant proposals.  Then, at last, academic nirvana. For anyone following the...

International exchange program opens new vistas for future scientists

August 26, 2015 | Blog

Recently, three gifted engineering students from Mexico stepped upon the ASU campus, each embarking on a personal journey of discovery and challenge as participants in a new cultural exchange program. 2015 was the inaugural year for Biodesign to host three budding scientists: Victor Abraham Guerrero (mentor Wei Kong, Biodesign Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology), Andrea Molina (mentor Rolf Halden, Biodesign Center for Environmental...

From farmer to pharmer: ASU's "Ask a Biologist" profiles Charles Arntzen's amazing career path

August 11, 2015 | Blog

Using "Bad" Plants for Good By Dianne E. Price Illustrated by Jason Drees   The grass tickles your toes as you stretch out under the shade of a big tree. You take a bite of a crisp apple, with a tangy sweetness that you feel in your cheeks. Animals, including humans, are forever linked with plants. After all, plants don't just give us a nice spot to relax. They also give life – they provide us with oxygen and food energy.   But what about those plants that are not so...

Bringing Project HoneyBee Learnings to Chapel Hill

July 10, 2015 | Blog

The holes in the healthcare system became truly clear to Theresa (Terri) Floegel–a nurse with many years of experience under her belt–once she began teaching prospective nurses and watching her nursing students show her what they thought was the priority in caring for older hospital patients. Conversations revolved around fixing injury or disease rather than supporting the whole person to regain health and stay healthy. This drove her passion for thinking a bit further outside of the...

Girl Power in New Orleans: Conquering the ASM2015 Meeting

June 25, 2015 | Blog

It was that time of the year again:  thousands of microbiologists and microbiology enthusiasts packed their suitcases and traveled to the 115th American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Annual Meeting. This year, the destination was NOLA! New Orleans had lots to offer to first-time visitors like us:  from local fresh seafood dishes to swamps with alligators.  Unlike last year, this year ladies only contingent (Sofia Esquivel, Dr. Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown, and I)...

Fostering the sustainability movement

May 21, 2015 | Blog

Omaya Ahmad is completing her Ph.D. in the School of Sustainability at ASU. She has spent the past decade thriving in her academic career at ASU, most recently with the Biodesign Institute Center for Sustainable Health’s Sustainability Science Education project. The Sustainability Science Education project was awarded ASU’s 2015 President's Award for Sustainability for the development and success of a new innovative course, SCN 400 Sustainability Science for Teachers. 

Green: The color of life

April 22, 2015 | Blog

On this Earth day, we thought it would be appropriate to excerpt a new article by the New York Times' Natalie Angier, which pays tribute to the dazzling chemistry of plants, and the importance of being green to life.    She writes:   "Scientists, too, appreciate green’s many charms and for manifold reasons, starting with one best grasped through a walk in a newly spring-sanctioned park. Chlorophyll, the pigment that makes plants green, lies at the heart of...