Faculty


Center Director

Michael Lynch

Michael Lynch

mlynch11@asu.edu

Michael Lynch is a Professor in the School of Life Sciences. He received his B.S. in Biology from St. Bonaventure University, and his Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Lynch has served as President of the Genetics Society of America, the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution, the Society for the Study of Evolution, and the American Genetic Association. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.



Faculty Associates

Dieter Armbruster

Dieter Armbruster

ARMBRUSTER@asu.edu

Dieter Armbruster is interested in mathematical modeling: Collective behavior of swarms, modeling disaster recovery, modeling and optimization of production flow in semiconductor factories, derivation and analysis of the evolution of ant colonies and other social insects and modeling of molecular signaling pathways have been recent topics. A common feature among all these models is the occurrence of emergent phenomena: the system consisting of many individual parts behaves in novel ways that are not present at the individual level. Understanding the dynamics of emergent phenomena is important to understand the evolution of biological and social behavior, controlling them allows us to optimize factory production, traffic flows and emergency evacuations.


Reed Cartwright

Reed Cartwright

cartwright@asu.edu

Reed Cartwright (Ph.D. Genetics, University of Georgia) is an Assistant Professor of Genomics, Evolution, and Bioinformatics in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University. His laboratory is located in The Biodesign Institute at ASU. His research interests cover many different questions in population genetics and molecular evolution, focusing on computational biology and stochastic models. He has worked on frequency-dependent selection models, spatial genetic models, indel evolution models, sequence alignment, and phylogenetic models.


Jeff Jensen

Jeff Jensen

Jeffrey.D.Jensen@asu.edu

Jeff Jensen is a population geneticist and Professor in the ASU School of Life Sciences and the Center for Evolution & Medicine. The Jensen Lab develops theory and statistical methodology for describing and quantifying evolutionary processes, and analyzes natural population data to describe the relative roles of these processes during the colonization of novel environments. The lab also analyzes experimental evolution data in order to gain insights into the underlying distribution of selective effects and fitness landscapes.


Carlo Maley

Carlo Maley

maley@asu.edu

Professor Maley is a cancer biologist, evolutionary biologist and computational biologist, working at the intersection of those fields. His team applies evolutionary and ecological theory to three problems in cancer: (1) Neoplastic progression: the evolutionary dynamics among cells of a tumor that drive progression from normal tissue to malignant cancers, (2) Acquired therapeutic resistance: the evolutionary dynamics by which our therapies select for resistance and we fail to cure cancer, and (3) the evolution of cancer suppression mechanisms in large, long-lived animals like elephants and whales (a problem called Peto’s Paradox).


Marco Mangone

Marco Mangone

mangone@asu.edu

My scientific path has taken me from bioinformatics to wet-bench biology to high-throughput genomic projects. In spring 1999, after I graduated from the University La Sapienza in Rome (Italy), I joined Dr. Lincoln Stein’s lab at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), NY, as a Scientific Programmer to learn bioinformatics. Lincoln is a pioneer in the field and well-known for developing complex genomic interfaces and tools that make the access and analysis of genomic datasets simple for non-expert users.


Susanne Pfeiffer

Susanne Pfeifer

Susanne.Pfeifer@asu.edu

Susanne Pfeifer is a computational molecular biologist appointed in the ASU School of Life Sciences. The Pfeifer lab is interested in studying genetic and evolutionary processes by combining large-scale, high-throughput sequence data analysis, model-based statistical inference and modelling. The lab has two main foci: first, to understand how natural selection shapes patterns of genetic variation in populations (with particular interest in understanding the process of adaptation during rapid environmental change) and second, to elucidate the causes and consequences of recombination and mutation rate variation (with a focus on primates).


Wade Van Horn

Wade Van Horn

wade.van.horn@asu.edu

Wade Van Horn is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and is an investigator of the Biodesign institute, the Center for Personalized Diagnostics, and the Magnetic Resonance Research Center. He joined Arizona State University in 2012 after an American Heart Association postdoctoral fellowship at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in the Department of Biochemistry and the Center for Structural Biology. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Utah Department of Chemistry. His current interests focus on the interplay between biomolecular function and structure, especially as it relates to human physiology and pathophysiology.


Arvind Varsani

Arvind Varsani

Arvind.Varsani@asu.edu

Arvind Varsani is a molecular virologist who works across ecosystems from plants to animals and from the tropics to the Antarctic. His research uses a combination of traditional virology, microscopy (including transmission electron microscopy), molecular and cellular biology techniques in conjunction with modern sequencing techniques, synthetic biology and bioinformatics to characterize viruses and understand their dynamics.


Melissa Wilson-Sayres

Melissa Wilson-Sayres

melissa.wilsonsayres@asu.edu

Melissa Wilson Sayres is a computational biologist whose main research interests include sex-biased biology. She studies the evolution of sex chromosomes (X and Y in mammals), why mutation rates differ between males and females, and how changes in population history affect the sex chromosomes differently than the non-sex chromosomes. Generally she studies mammals, but is also curious about the sex-biased biology of flies, worms and plants.