News & Events

ASU researchers chip away the mysteries of cancer metastasis

July 10, 2019

One of the current paradigms in cancer treatment is not to treat a tumor itself. Rather, therapeutics can focus on a tumor’s microenvironment — the area where tumor cells and a patient’s healthy tissues collide. Mehdi Nikkhah, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University, has been working for the past five years on bioengineering a way to study the tumor microenvironment. In a project led by recent ASU...

Expert shares advances and opportunities for genetic editing

November 8, 2018

Genome engineering was the subject of the day as Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute kicked off a new lecture series designed to bring science’s preeminent thought leaders to ASU. The Arntzen Grand Challenges Lecture Series launched on Nov. 1 with a presentation by Samuel Sternberg, co-author of A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution—the premiere text on the emergence and future of genetic editing. CRISPR is a revolutionary tool...

International collaboration reaches milestone in curating new resource for unraveling human disease

February 25, 2016

Gene bank collection now totals 80 percent of all human protein-coding genes, collaboration reports An international collaboration of organizations, including Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, has reached a milestone in creating a library of complete genetic blueprints for the thousands of different proteins in human cells, called the human proteome. The collection – consisting of open-reading frames (ORFs), the portions of genes that...

Gut microbe research featured in Nature

May 2, 2014

In a new Nature magazine feature article, science writer Sarah Deweerdt interviews leading researchers who are unravelling the fascinating relationship between diet, gut microbes and human diseases. Among those featured is research led by Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown, whose team examines the links between gut microbes, obesity, and more recently, an intriguing connection with autism.  Deweerdt writes: In an ongoing study, [Bruce] Rittmann and Krajmalnik-Brown are...

Clues about autism may come from the gut

July 3, 2013

Bacterial flora inhabiting the human gut have become one of the hottest topics in biological research. Implicated in a range of important activities including digestion, fine-tuning body weight, regulating immune response, and producing neurotransmitters that affect brain and behavior, these tiny workers form diverse communities. Hundreds of species inhabit the gut, and although most are beneficial, some can be very dangerous. In new research appearing in the journal PLOS ONE, a team led by...