News & Events

Founding director of ASU’s Biodesign Institute, Charles Arntzen, retires

November 10, 2017

Arntzen's creative science leads to discovery of Ebola antidote   From his roots as a fair-haired Minnesota farm boy to climbing the ladder of success in big pharma to blazing a translational academic research path into life-saving therapies, Charles Arntzen has led one extraordinary life in science.  During the course of a prolific career, Arntzen and his collaborators have gained international recognition and helped burnish a special shine on ASU’s star with their dedicated...

Cancer Stem Cell Plasticity in Malignant Gliomas

November 8, 2017

Presented by Shwetal Mehta, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology, Barrow Brain Tumor Research Center.  Glioblastoma multiforme are highly infiltrative, aggressive and lethal primary brain tumors in adults that are resistant to conventional treatments. Current treatment regimens are mostly palliative and the tumors almost always recur. A major clinical obstacle in treatment of GBMs is the presence of intratumoral heterogeneity due to multiple deregulated pathways...

Now showing: 3D movie of a virus in action

August 14, 2017

A research collaboration led by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee has for the first time created a three-dimensional movie showing a virus preparing to infect a healthy cell. The research promises to help advance our understanding of changes that viruses undergo during infection. This could lead to better therapeutic treatments and prevention of viral diseases when applied to studies of viruses that infect humans and other hosts. The feat was made possible by UWM physicists, who...

Scientists develop improved, potentially safer Zika vaccine

August 9, 2017

Tobacco plant produced vaccine could also be less costly, targeted for the developing world The worldwide Zika threat first emerged in 2015, infecting millions as it swept across the Americas. It struck great fear in pregnant women, as babies born with severe brain birth defects quickly overburdened hospitals and public health care systems. In response, there has been a flurry of heroic scientific efforts to stop Zika.  Whole governments, academic labs and pharmaceutical companies...

ASU faculty find kindred community of educators in a far-off land

July 12, 2017

Lindy Elkins-Tanton, Bert Jacobs lead 2-day teachers' workshop in Tanzania to help create students passionate about learning Sometimes Arizona State University’s mission is carried out far beyond the boundaries of campus. This summer two ASU faculty members — Lindy Elkins-Tanton, director of the School of Earth and Space Exploration, and Bert Jacobs, director of the School of Life Sciences — went to Tanzania, where they led a team conducting a two-day teaching workshop for...

Women in philanthropy expands Biodesign cancer research support

June 8, 2017

New grants from Women & Philanthropy, a philanthropic program of the ASU Foundation, will distribute $250,000 to support three initiatives that span innovative cancer research and a unique prisoner education program at ASU.  With the awards, the Women & Philanthropy program will continue its support of ASU’s Biodesign Institute, where researchers are combatting disease and improving health in myriad ways—including two new promising cancer therapy studies. “Cancer kills...

Is the world ready for another Ebola outbreak?

May 17, 2017

A new Ebola outbreak in remote areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo has some public health officials on guard for larger outbreaks to come, but Arizona State University’s Charles Arntzen, who played a crucial role in development of the Ebola therapeutic drug called ZMapp, says the current outbreak is small and there are a number of fledgling drugs that can be used to fight it and vaccinate the people in local areas. Q:  What do you know about the current Ebola outbreak in the...

What if We Could Harness the Capabilities of Our Own Immune System to Cure Cancer?

May 17, 2017

Cheryl Selinsky, Ph.D., Vice President, Research Operations, Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy Immunotherapy harnesses your body’s own defenses to fight cancer. It takes the always-on defense of your own immune system and trains it to recognize cancer cells and to kill them. Dramatic responses seen in metastatic melanoma patients treated with immunotherapy spurred a renewed invigoration of the field and the promise it holds to offer robust and durable responses in many cancers....

ASU postdoc awarded Alfred P. Sloan Foundation - NASA joint fellowship to study International Space Station microbes

May 16, 2017

Arizona State University has received new support from the prestigious Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and NASA for its rising research stars to study the microbiome of the built environment on board the International Space Station (ISS).  ASU Biodesign Institute postdoctoral researcher Jiseon Yang was just one of five scientists chosen from across the country for a fellowship award from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation under a joint call with NASA – “Microbes of the Built Environment...

‘Science Exposed’: Performance art meets science in experimental collaboration

March 29, 2017

Artist vs. scientist. Right vs. left brain. Creativity vs. stark logic. When the seemingly separate worlds of art and science collide, will they produce chaos or a masterwork? This semester, in a new “Science Exposed: Bringing Science to Life through the Arts” initiative, a dozen of ASU’s Herberger Institute artists and Biodesign Institute scientists are about to find out what happens when art and science collide. Three diverse projects now underway may give audiences pause and...