Eric Reiman

Eric Reiman

Co-Director, ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center
Executive Director, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Professor, School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University

Bio

Eric Reiman, M.D., is an international research heavyweight in the area of developing new therapies to prevent and treat Alzheimer’s disease. Reiman’s research focuses on brain imaging, genomics, the unusually early detection and tracking of Alzheimer's disease, and the accelerated evaluation of Alzheimer’s prevention therapies.

Reiman led the formation of the ASU-Banner research with two other heavyweights: one of the nation’s largest public research universities – ASU – and one of the nation’s largest nonprofit health systems – Banner Health.

The partnership is an extension of work with the Arizona Alzheimer’s Consortium, a leading model of statewide collaboration in biomedical research. As a result in Reiman’s leadership in forming the AAC in 1998, the seven partnering organizations have made collaborative strides in furthering research on Alzheimer’s disease, which afflicts more than 5 million Americans.

Reiman is an author of more than 250 peer-reviewed publications and currently serves as the deputy editor for the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. He has been honored with the Howard E. Wulsin Excellence in Teaching Award by the Arizona Psychiatric Society, Arizona Business Journal’s Health Care Hero award and listed in “Best Doctors in America” since 1996.

Reiman has held leadership positions at the University of Arizona Department of Psychiatry and Translational Genomics Institute. Prior to coming to Arizona, Reiman held positions at Washington University School of Medicine, where he completed one of his residencies in psychiatry. He completed his first residency at Duke University, where he earned both a medical degree and a bachelor’s in zoology and philosophy.

n 2006, he and his colleagues established the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, which is intended to evaluate promising pre-symptomatic treatments as quickly as possible, establish a new standard of care that addresses the family’s full range of medical and non-medical needs, and forge a model of multi-institutional collaboration in biomedical research. - See more at: http://www.geoffreybeene.com/rockstars/?page_id=1059#sthash.t99pxDLF.dpuf
In 1998, Dr. Reiman and his colleagues established the Arizona Alzheimer’s Consortium, the leading example of statewide collaboration in AD research. The Consortium is comprised of about 150 researchers and support staff from seven biomedical research institutions, including Arizona State University, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, Banner Sun Health Research Institute, Barrow Neurological Institute, Mayo Clinic Arizona, TGen and University of Arizona. It capitalizes on complementary resources from different scientific disciplines and institutions, and it continues to make major contributions to the scientific study of AD. - See more at: http://www.geoffreybeene.com/rockstars/?page_id=1059#sthash.t99pxDLF.dpuf

 

Dr. Reiman received his undergraduate and medical degrees at Duke University, his residency training in Psychiatry at Duke and Washington University, and his training in positron emission tomography (PET) research as a resident and faculty member at Washington University under the mentorship of Dr. Marcus Raichle. He and his colleagues have used brain imaging techniques to investigate how regions of the human brain work in concert to orchestrate normal human behaviors, like emotion and memory, and how they conspire to produce behavioral disorders. Along the way, they developed new brain mapping techniques, including a way to mold each person’s image into a standard shape and average images from different people that helped lead to a new era in the study of the human mind and brain.

In 1993, he and his Arizona colleagues turned their attention to the problem of AD. They have used imaging techniques to detect and track brain changes in people at genetic risk for AD, starting decades before the onset of symptoms. They developed a new way to rapidly evaluate AD risk factors and a rapid way to evaluate promising prevention therapies in people at risk for AD using imaging methods, and their work has provided a springboard for other studies. For instance, they have used advanced research methods to implicate several common genes in the risk of AD and a common gene that may contribute to individual differences in normal memory performance; they continue to develop imaging tools with improved power to study AD and evaluate AD-modifying treatments.

In 1998, Dr. Reiman and his colleagues established the Arizona Alzheimer’s Consortium, the leading example of statewide collaboration in AD research. The Consortium is comprised of about 150 researchers and support staff from seven biomedical research institutions, including Arizona State University, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, Banner Sun Health Research Institute, Barrow Neurological Institute, Mayo Clinic Arizona, TGen and University of Arizona. It capitalizes on complementary resources from different scientific disciplines and institutions, and it continues to make major contributions to the scientific study of AD.

In 2006, he and his colleagues established the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, which is intended to evaluate promising pre-symptomatic treatments as quickly as possible, establish a new standard of care that addresses the family’s full range of medical and non-medical needs, and forge a model of multi-institutional collaboration in biomedical research.

Most recently, Dr.Reiman and his colleagues proposed an “Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative” to conduct the first prevention trials of investigational medication or immunization therapies in cognitively normal people who, based on their age and genetic background, are at the highest imminent risk of AD symptoms. They hope to conduct the first prevention trials of amyloid-modifying treatments as early as 2012 and establish the scientific means and accelerated FDA approval pathway needed to evaluate a range of promising prevention therapies as quickly as possible. In this way, they are determined to help launch the era of AD prevention research and try to find demonstrably effective treatments to end AD without losing another generation.

- See more at: http://www.geoffreybeene.com/rockstars/?page_id=1059#sthash.t99pxDLF.dpuf