Eric Reiman

Eric Reiman

Faculty Member, ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center
Professor, Office of University Provost

Bio

Dr. Eric Reiman is Executive Director of the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, Chief Executive Officer of Banner Research, University Professor of Neuroscience at Arizona State University (ASU), Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Arizona, Clinical Director of Neurogenomics at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), and Director of the Arizona Alzheimer’s Consortium.  He is also interim Director of the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Research Center (NDRC).

He received his undergraduate and medical education at Duke University and his Psychiatry Residency Training at Duke and Washington University, and launched his career in brain imaging research under the mentorship of Marcus Raichle at Washington University in St. Louis. He has played leadership roles in brain imaging, brain mapping, and genomics research, the unusually early detection and tracking of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and the accelerated evaluation of Alzheimer’s prevention therapies.  More recently he has become actively involved in the development and use of blood-based Biomarkers and the discovery of APOE-related disease mechanisms and treatments. He has also sought to advance new models of biomedical research collaboration and dementia care.

Dr. Reiman and his Banner Alzheimer’s Institute colleagues established the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative (API) to launch a new era in Alzheimer’s prevention research. API includes public-private partnerships, prevention trials and biomarker development programs in cognitively unimpaired persons at high genetic and/or biomarker risk for AD, unusually large registries and innovative programs to support enrollment in these and other studies, precedent-setting trial data and biological sample sharing agreements, and other efforts to help find and support the approval, affordability and availability of prevention therapies as soon as possible.

Dr. Reiman is an author of about 500 publications, a principal investigator of six current NIH grants, and a member of the National Advisory Council on Aging (NIA Council). He is a recipient of the Potamkin Prize for his pioneering contributions to the study of preclinical AD and the accelerated evaluation of AD prevention therapies.

n 2006, he and his colleagues established the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, which is intended to evaluate promising pre-symptomatic treatments as quickly as possible, establish a new standard of care that addresses the family’s full range of medical and non-medical needs, and forge a model of multi-institutional collaboration in biomedical research. - See more at: http://www.geoffreybeene.com/rockstars/?page_id=1059#sthash.t99pxDLF.dpuf
In 1998, Dr. Reiman and his colleagues established the Arizona Alzheimer’s Consortium, the leading example of statewide collaboration in AD research. The Consortium is comprised of about 150 researchers and support staff from seven biomedical research institutions, including Arizona State University, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, Banner Sun Health Research Institute, Barrow Neurological Institute, Mayo Clinic Arizona, TGen and University of Arizona. It capitalizes on complementary resources from different scientific disciplines and institutions, and it continues to make major contributions to the scientific study of AD. - See more at: http://www.geoffreybeene.com/rockstars/?page_id=1059#sthash.t99pxDLF.dpuf

 

Dr. Reiman received his undergraduate and medical degrees at Duke University, his residency training in Psychiatry at Duke and Washington University, and his training in positron emission tomography (PET) research as a resident and faculty member at Washington University under the mentorship of Dr. Marcus Raichle. He and his colleagues have used brain imaging techniques to investigate how regions of the human brain work in concert to orchestrate normal human behaviors, like emotion and memory, and how they conspire to produce behavioral disorders. Along the way, they developed new brain mapping techniques, including a way to mold each person’s image into a standard shape and average images from different people that helped lead to a new era in the study of the human mind and brain.

In 1993, he and his Arizona colleagues turned their attention to the problem of AD. They have used imaging techniques to detect and track brain changes in people at genetic risk for AD, starting decades before the onset of symptoms. They developed a new way to rapidly evaluate AD risk factors and a rapid way to evaluate promising prevention therapies in people at risk for AD using imaging methods, and their work has provided a springboard for other studies. For instance, they have used advanced research methods to implicate several common genes in the risk of AD and a common gene that may contribute to individual differences in normal memory performance; they continue to develop imaging tools with improved power to study AD and evaluate AD-modifying treatments.

In 1998, Dr. Reiman and his colleagues established the Arizona Alzheimer’s Consortium, the leading example of statewide collaboration in AD research. The Consortium is comprised of about 150 researchers and support staff from seven biomedical research institutions, including Arizona State University, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, Banner Sun Health Research Institute, Barrow Neurological Institute, Mayo Clinic Arizona, TGen and University of Arizona. It capitalizes on complementary resources from different scientific disciplines and institutions, and it continues to make major contributions to the scientific study of AD.

In 2006, he and his colleagues established the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, which is intended to evaluate promising pre-symptomatic treatments as quickly as possible, establish a new standard of care that addresses the family’s full range of medical and non-medical needs, and forge a model of multi-institutional collaboration in biomedical research.

Most recently, Dr.Reiman and his colleagues proposed an “Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative” to conduct the first prevention trials of investigational medication or immunization therapies in cognitively normal people who, based on their age and genetic background, are at the highest imminent risk of AD symptoms. They hope to conduct the first prevention trials of amyloid-modifying treatments as early as 2012 and establish the scientific means and accelerated FDA approval pathway needed to evaluate a range of promising prevention therapies as quickly as possible. In this way, they are determined to help launch the era of AD prevention research and try to find demonstrably effective treatments to end AD without losing another generation.

- See more at: http://www.geoffreybeene.com/rockstars/?page_id=1059#sthash.t99pxDLF.dpuf