News & Events

Have you been 'zombified'?

June 12, 2019

Athena Aktipis wants brains. Not because she’s a zombie but because she’s been zombi-fied. And so have you. By social media. By stress. By your friends. Even by loyal old Fido. And the only cure is to bring as many brains from as many fields possible together to get a handle on how and why those noodley masses of muscle and synapses can be manipulated by forces seemingly beyond our control. That’s the premise of the Arizona State University psychology professor’s new podcast,...

Cactus garden plants new ideas for understanding cancer

April 2, 2019

“From the very beginning I had this idea that cancer isn’t something I need to fight or have to try to beat. It’s a natural thing, and I have to learn to live with it.” When Kevin Moore joined the cancer garden project team, he was dealing with stomach cancer. A landscape architect with the Moore/Swick partnership, in Tempe, Ariz., Moore is now cancer-free. Moore explained that while working on the project, he learned that “cancer is a natural thing. Part of my body that went...

Life’s many histories open new approaches to cancer

February 26, 2019

For most humans, a family of ten would be considered abundant. But for many other forms of life on earth, that’s.. well…chicken feed. Take the ocean sunfish for example. At spawning time, a female will commonly disgorge some 300 million eggs into her liquid habitat, which are subsequently fertilized externally. Only a tiny fraction of these eggs will hatch and survive. The resulting fry, each the size of a pinhead, can eventually grow to the proportions of a rhinocersos. Why do...

Probing life’s simplest organism to understand the complexity of cancer

February 18, 2019

The simplest multicellular animal known to man (Trichoplax adhaerens) has no nervous system, no muscle tissue, and, most importantly, no history of cancer. Typically, cancer is a disease afflicting multicellular organisms that spreads as cells grow and divide. Arizona State University researchers are looking to these small creatures to learn more about how they evade the deadly disease, and the implications this has for other multicellular animals. At the Biodesign Center for...

Discovering New Cancer Treatments By Studying Cacti

December 12, 2018

What can a type of cactus tell us about cancer, and treating the disease? Two researchers at ASU believe it's a lot. Carlo Maley and Athena Aktipis have helped set up a cactus garden on the school’s Tempe campus — but the garden doesn’t feature the kinds of specimens you might expect to see. Instead, they’re plants with kinds of malformations on them. Maley is an associate professor in ASU’s School of Life Sciences and director of the Arizona Cancer Evolution Center. Aktipis is...

Calling all Deadheads: ASU hosts Zombie Apocalypse Medicine Meeting

October 10, 2018

We see it in movies, TV shows and books, but we rarely see it in science – the zombie apocalypse may be nearer than we think, and an ASU-hosted event intends to address that. On Oct. 18-21, ASU will host the Zombie Apocalypse Medicine Meeting, an interdisciplinary gathering blending the arts and sciences to address the provocative, ever-engaging topic of zombies. According to the website, a zombie is defined as “an entity that is fully or partially under control of another entity,” a...

Evolution and Cancer take center stage at ISEEC conference

January 8, 2018

  Evolution is the creative force shaping all earthly life. It is also the reason why all multicellular life is susceptible to cancer. The processes of evolution are the fuel behind the interplay of malignant cells with the bodies they attack. From Dec 7-10th, researchers attended ISEEC 2017, the conference of the International Society for Evolution, Ecology and Cancer, held on the Tempe campus of Arizona State University. The conference, which is held every other year, drew a highly...

Cancer through the lens of evolution

October 23, 2017

“What does not kill me, makes me stronger.” The oft-repeated maxim, (from Nietzsche’s Twilight of the Idols), offers a model of human fortitude. It could also serve as the motto of a cancer cell, emphasizing—with brutal precision—how treatment-resistant cancers outwit our best medical interventions.  Cancer owes its ability to colonize and devastate the body to the same Darwinian forces that have shaped all life on earth: chance mutation and natural selection....

ASU symposium examines cheating

February 21, 2017

The guy at work who contributes squat to a team project. The one who develops alligator arms every time the check arrives. The people you’ve had for dinner 20 times who always show up empty-handed. Does it make you feel any better that ants, bees and wasps suffer from similar company? Arizona State University’s first Cooperation and Conflict Symposium was held Thursday, bringing scholars from around campus and the world to discuss “Solving the problem of cheating in large-scale...

All cells must die!

May 24, 2016

Event recap | Emerge 2016: The Future of Sport What will sports look like 25 years in the future? Jerseys might have built in heart monitors and defibrillators, skates may hover over magnetic tracks, and the Olympics may be held in outer space. Judging by the costumes of the night, there will be a lot of neon and silver, clothing will be infused with technology, and dogs will wear matching tracksuits with their owners. Another trend of the night was an increase in brain games and puzzles,...