News and events

The Palumbo Charitable Trust awards Erica Forzani $50,000

April 23, 2021

The Palumbo Charitable Trust awarded Erica Forzani $50,000 to pursue “A novel contactless system to monitor energy balance and physical fitness under free-living conditions.” The grant will aid Forzani’s research of obesity and underweight problems that cause health struggles for so many individuals. Forzani, an associate professor in Biodesign’s Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors, and her team will focus on analyzing the effect of exercise and physical fitness on resting and...

National Academy of Inventors elevates Forzani to senior member

March 5, 2021

Erica Forzani helped bring the world the first mobile device capable of detecting inflammatory biomarkers for asthma and the first point-of-care mobile sensor for real-time detection of carbon dioxide. A faculty member in the Biodesign Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Forzani also had a leading role in developing the first mobile metabolic rate tracker and a device for detection of ammonia in biological fluids to diagnose problems related to urea metabolism, liver disease and...

Technique permits convenient, precise optical imaging of individual proteins

September 21, 2020

Often considered the workhorses of the body, proteins are among the most important biomolecules critical to life processes. They provide structural foundation for cells and tissues and perform a dizzying array of tasks, from metabolizing energy and helping cells communicate with one another to defending the body from pathogens and guiding cell division and growth. Because protein dysfunction is implicated in so many serious diseases, proteins are the primary targets for most therapeutic...

Bacteria visualized with remarkable clarity thanks to new technique

July 10, 2020

An escalating arms race between disease-causing bacteria and the antibiotic weapons humans have designed to fight them, continues. Disturbingly, pathogenic microbes are often outwitting our best efforts, developing resistance to many mainline antibiotics. Overuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics in medicine and agriculture is driving bacterial resistance to these life-saving tools. In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors outline an innovative means...

ASU jumps to top 10 in global patent rankings

June 5, 2019

Arizona State University has moved into the top 10 of all universities worldwide for U.S. patents awarded in 2018. The university jumped to 10th place from 17th in 2017, according to a new report by the U.S. National Academy of Inventors and the Intellectual Property Owners Association.  ASU tied with the University of Michigan for the No. 10 spot on the list. Other universities listed in the top 10 include the University of California, Stanford University, MIT and the...

Quantum strangeness gives rise to new electronics

February 11, 2019

Noting the startling advances in semiconductor technology, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore proposed that the number of transistors on a chip will double each year, an observation that has been born out since he made the claim in 1965. Still, it’s unlikely Moore could have foreseen the extent of the electronics revolution currently underway. Today, a new breed of devices, bearing unique properties, is being developed. As ultra-miniaturization continues apace, researchers have begun to explore...

ASU start-up wins Arizona Innovation Challenge

January 24, 2019

Breezing, a spin-out company that was the result of discoveries made at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute, was recently named an Arizona Innovation Challenge winner by the Arizona Commerce Authority. The start-up, founded by NJ Tao, director of the Biodesign Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors, and Erica Forzani, a researcher in the center and an associate professor at the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, has developed a wearable device that offers precise...

Biodesign investigators awarded $5.8M NIH grant to develop antimicrobial susceptibility test

November 28, 2018

Resistant strains of bacteria pose a serious threat to the security of our global health system. As more and more bacteria develop resistance to our best antibiotics, once treatable diseases may re-emerge, potentially causing mass epidemics. “Antibiotic resistant bacterial infections, now originating in both healthcare and community settings, pose serious consequences for public health and burden the U.S. economy with up to $20 billion in healthcare costs each year,” Shelley Haydel, an...

Biodesign symposium hosts researchers from West China

November 19, 2018

Joshua LaBaer, executive director of the Biodesign Institute, co-hosted a lively and innovative symposium, greeting the international guests in their native language. After enthusiastic applause, the presentations began. The symposium, which hosted representatives from Sichuan University and West China Hospital, in addition to researchers from the Biodesign Institute, focused on exploring strategies for the detection and treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. The gathering...

Going with the DNA flow: molecule of life finds new uses in microelectronics

February 26, 2018

For sheer versatility, there’s no molecule quite like DNA. The iconic double-helix carries the genetic blueprint for living forms ranging from single-celled organisms to human beings. Recently, researchers have found that DNA’s remarkable properties of self-assembly and its ability to conduct electrical charge over considerable distance make it ideally suited for myriad applications, including tiny electronic circuits and computing devices, nanorobots and new advances in...